Chittenden Bank appoints Kelly new president

first_imgCHITTENDEN BANK APPOINTS NEW PRESIDENTBurlington — Chittenden Bank’s Board of Directors announcedtoday, the appointment of John W. Kelly as President and CEO of ChittendenBank. As President and CEO, Mr. Kelly will oversee all aspects ofChittenden Bank’s retail, commercial and wealth management operations.Mr. Kelly has been serving as interim president for Chittenden sinceLawrence W. DeShaw retired in April. Mr. Kelly assumes the role ofPresident and CEO immediately.Mr. Kelly began his banking career in 1973 working for The PoughkeepsieSavings Bank as the Assistant Vice President. In 1983, he joined Bank ofNew England – Old Colony as the Executive Vice President. In December of1990, Mr. Kelly joined Chittenden as the Executive Vice President incharge of Commercial Banking. He served most recently as Chief BankingOfficer from January 2003 through the present.”John is an accomplished banking professional who has over 30 years offinancial experience, ” commented Paul Perrault, Chairman of ChittendenCorporation. “We are fortunate to have John lead Chittenden in the yearsahead with his vast local financial services experience. I am confidentJohn will continue to build momentum and provide our customers with theservice that they have come to expect from Chittenden.””On behalf of Chittenden Bank’s Board of Directors, I am pleased to makethis announcement today. With John’s experience and commitment he is agreat match for Chittenden’s team of financial experts and theircustomers. Chittenden is committed to the communities of Vermont and hasbeen servicing the financial needs of Vermonters for 100 years. John hasthat same drive and commitment to continue to build an institution thatthinks about the customer and their needs first,” commented Chairman ofthe Board, Fred Bertrand.ABOUT CHITTENDEN BANKChittenden Bank is a full-service, Vermont-headquartered and managed bankproviding a wide range of financial services and products to individualsand businesses. As the largest Vermont-based bank in the state, Chittendenoffers 51 locations. To find out more about Chittenden, visit our websiteat www.chittenden.com(link is external) or call your local branch.ABOUT CHITTENDEN CORPORATIONChittenden Corporation is a bank holding company headquartered inBurlington, Vermont. Through its subsidiary banks, the Company offers abroad range of financial products and services to customers throughoutNorthern New England and Massachusetts, including deposit accounts andservices; commercial and consumer loans; insurance; and investment andtrust services to individuals, businesses and the public sector.last_img read more

Welch announces staff appointments

first_imgUS Representative Peter Welch has announced the appointment of a new communications director and a new legislative director.Welch promoted Scott Coriell, who has worked as a staff assistant and press assistant in his Washington office, to the position of communications director. Also promoted was Jake Oster, who previously served as scheduler and legislative assistant, to the position of legislative director.A Killington native and a graduate of Middlebury College, Coriell previously served as program coordinator for World Camp Inc., a non-profit organization that provides HIV/AIDS outreach services to communities in Malawi. Coriell also interned for Representative Rush Holt (D-NJ) and managed the web site of his family’s Killington-based business, Peak Performance Ski Shop. His brother, David, was Governor Jim Douglas’ last press secretary.Oster, a graduate of the University of Vermont, previously served as director of grassroots advocacy for the Humane Society of the United States, deputy political director for the Humane Society Legislative Fund and on the staff of Representative Tim Holden (D-PA).Coriell’s appointment takes effect next Monday. Oster assumed his new position earlier this year. Source: Welch’s office. 3.8.2011last_img read more

Contractor, homeowner to pay Vermont $87,000 for cleanup of hazardous waste

first_imgA contractor and a homeowner will pay the State of Vermont a total of over $87,000 to resolve the Attorney General’s claims for the cleanup of an illegal and unpermitted discharge of hazardous waste.‘Contractors must follow Vermont law when disposing of hazardous waste,’ said Attorney General William Sorrell.In the spring of 2010, Travis Smith, a contractor based in Granville, New York, discharged water containing home heating oil into soil near Tinmouth Pond. When a nearby resident noticed an oily sheen in the water and shore of the pond, he contacted the Vermont Agency of Natural Resources, which undertook an immediate and full cleanup of the area. The matter was then referred to the Attorney General’s Office.The current settlement includes recognition that contamination from the spill ‘caused damage to nearby properties and natural resources,’ and requires payments to reimburse the state for all of the costs that it expended in pursuing the full cleanup of the site. The settlement funds will go directly into the State’s Petroleum Cleanup Fund and the Environmental Contingency Fund.Vermont Attorney General December 13, 2011last_img read more

On the Blogs: Emerging Economies Lead Renewable Investment Surge

first_imgOn the Blogs: Emerging Economies Lead Renewable Investment Surge FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Tim Smedley for Raconteur.net:The biggest renewable investors included Chile ($3.5 billion, up 157 per cent) South Africa ($4.5 billion, up 329 per cent) and Morocco ($2 billion, up from almost zero in 2014). India saw investments rise 22 per cent to $10.2 billion while China, now the world’s biggest investor in renewable technology, spent $102.9 billion on renewables (36 percent of the world total).If you consider investments relative to annual GDP, the top five investors globally were actually Mauritania, Honduras, Uruguay, Morocco and Jamaica. Meanwhile, Costa Rica is remarkably close to becoming the first developing country to have 100 per cent renewable electricity.“Wind and solar power are now being adopted in many developing countries as a natural and substantial part of the generation mix,” says Michael Liebreich, chairman of the advisory board at BNEF. “They can be produced more cheaply than often high wholesale power prices; they reduce a country’s exposure to expected future fossil fuel prices and, above all, they can be built very quickly.”While Europe is looking to more expensive offshore wind options to appease not-in-my-back-yard voters, many developing countries are happy with cheaper on-shore and solar options. This in turn means the companies selling those technologies are increasingly looking towards emerging markets. Total renewable investment in Europe actually slipped 21 per cent to $48.8 billion in 2015 and today’s growth market is in the global south.Kirsty Hamilton, an expert in renewable energy investment at Chatham House, outlines the mix of factors at play, including cost-reductions, strong government policies and investors actively looking for opportunities. The big European projects, such as Germany’s Energiewende, may have driven the growth in renewable energy technology, says Ms Hamilton, but recent political flip-flopping has seen investors “head to the least risky countries”.India’s prime minister Narendra Modi launched a global solar alliance at the Paris climate conference in December, with his own country aiming to increase solar installations from just below 5GW to 100GW by 2022. To put that into perspective, the UK’s entire nuclear capacity is currently 10GW. This would be more than double the present solar capacity of current global leader China.The project might sound far-fetched, but it is already underway. SB Energy, a joint Japanese-Taiwanese venture, recently won a bid for a 350MW project in India’s Andhra Pradesh province. The Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis describes India as “executing one of the most radical energy sector transformations ever undertaken.”Full item: Developing countries lead in clean energylast_img read more

Wind Farms Are Overtaking Coal-Fired Electricity in Texas

first_imgWind Farms Are Overtaking Coal-Fired Electricity in Texas FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Houston Chronicle:Wind power, by one important measure, surpassed coal last week to become the second-largest electricity source in Texas, yet another milestone in the state’s march toward greater reliance on renewable energy.When a 155-megawatt wind farm in West Texas began commercial operation this month, it pushed the state’s wind power capacity to more than 20,000 megawatts, surpassing 19,800 megawatts of capacity from coal-fired power plants, according to the Electric Reliability Council of Texas, which oversees 90 percent of the state’s grid. One megawatt is enough to power 200 homes on a hot Texas day.While ERCOT still gets most of its power from natural gas and coal, wind power generation now accounts for 15 percent of the power mix — up from just 2 percent a decade ago.The imminent shutdown of three coal-fired power plants owned by Dallas-based Vistra Energy and the loss of their 4,000 megawatts of capacity will further tip the scales in wind’s favor, said Joshua Rhodes, a research fellow at the University of Texas’ Energy Institute in Austin. In October, Vistra announced the pending shutdowns of its Monticello, Big Brown and Sandow coal plants, triggering the loss of more than 800 jobs and the closure of two coal mines. The shutdown of the Vistra plants are the first retirements of coal-fired power plants since Texas deregulated power markets in 2002.“We are used to seeing wind numbers add, add, add,” Rhodes said. “We are not used to seeing coal plants’ numbers decreasing.”Rhodes is already watching for the next milestone — when Texas’ wind farms will generate more power than its coal plants. Based on models of ERCOT, Rhodes expects that switch to happen in 2019. ERCOT, meanwhile, is looking to transform the way it predicts surges in wind — a mercurial power source in West Texas, where winds blow strongest at night when power demand is lowest, sometimes producing so much electricity that they drive wholesale prices to zero.More: Wind power blows past coal in Texaslast_img read more

Rhode Island offshore wind project to cost less than 10 cents per kilowatt-hour

first_imgRhode Island offshore wind project to cost less than 10 cents per kilowatt-hour FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Providence Journal:When critics assailed the high price awarded to Deepwater Wind nearly a decade ago for power from what would be the first offshore wind farm in the nation, the Providence company and its supporters in Rhode Island state government vowed that savings would come with future projects down the line.With a proposed agreement announced Thursday, they would fulfill that promise.Under the contract filed with the Public Utilities Commission, National Grid would pay Deepwater, now part of Danish-owned Orsted U.S. Offshore Wind, a flat rate over 20 years of 9.8 cents per kilowatt hour for power from its Revolution Wind Farm, a 400-megawatt project proposed in Rhode Island Sound.And critically, the deal is projected to save Rhode Island about $90 million in energy costs over the life of the contract, or about 50 cents per month for the typical electric customer in the state.The power purchase agreement proves that Rhode Island can develop renewable energy at an affordable cost, state energy commissioner Carol Grant said in an interview. “It’s not either/or. It’s not clean or affordable. It’s both,” she said.More: National Grid contract with Orsted would save customers $90 million over 20 yearslast_img read more

Empire District Electric proposes closing Asbury coal plant in Missouri

first_imgEmpire District Electric proposes closing Asbury coal plant in Missouri FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享S&P Global Market Intelligence ($):Empire District Electric Co. continues to see no future for its coal-fired Asbury power plant in Missouri and could potentially shutter the facility as soon as the end of this year.The Algonquin Power & Utilities Corp. subsidiary, which goes by Empire District Electric, a Liberty Utilities company, has filed with the Missouri Public Service Commission an integrated resource plan proposing retirement of the 198-MW plant by the end of this year and the addition of solar and storage resources starting in 2022. The plan also incorporates 600 MW of new wind generation that had previously been approved by regulators.The company said the plant, located in Jasper County, Mo., is “not a cost-effective resource for customers going forward,” given capital investments needed to meet environmental regulations and tough market conditions that are not expected to improve. Further, there are less expensive options to meet future capacity and energy needs, namely solar, wind and storage technologies.While the plan floats the idea of a 2019 retirement date, the company said it might take longer to close the plant, given notice requirements and shutdown procedures. For instance, Empire District has to give six months’ notice of a planned retirement to the Southwest Power Pool, safely and reliably run the plant with minimum staff levels and combust as much of the usable coal as possible.Company officials will continue to assess the best time to retire Asbury in the coming months. “In the meantime, Empire is currently working with an independent engineering firm to assess the potential demolition costs as well as evaluate whether the plant can be sold and if not, what might be salvaged to help mitigate closure costs,” the company said.Empire District in 2017 proposed to retire the plant, which has been operating since 1970, as part of a plan to develop 800 MW of wind by the end of 2020. At the time, the company said it wanted to retire the plant before making $20 million in environmental compliance upgrades needed by April 2019. But after discussions with stakeholders, the company revised the plan to add 600 MW of wind instead of 800 MW and keep the Asbury plant operating pending the development of an integrated resource plan. The commission approved the updated proposal in July 2018.More ($): Empire District suggests earlier retirement of Mo. coal plantlast_img read more

BP announces plans to boost green energy spending, cut oil and gas production

first_imgBP announces plans to boost green energy spending, cut oil and gas production FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享CNN:BP is planning to slash oil and gas production and pour billions of dollars into clean energy as part of a major strategic overhaul unveiled on Tuesday, alongside a huge second quarter loss and dividend cut.The London-based company said that it plans a 10-fold increase in annual low carbon investments to $5 billion by 2030 as it tries to deliver on its promise of net zero emissions by 2050 and prepares for a world that uses much less oil. BP shares rose as much as 8% in London.The company expects demand for fossil fuels to fall by 75% over the next 30 years if the increase in global temperatures is limited to 1.5 degrees Celsius, or by 50% if warming is less than 2 degrees, BP head of strategy Giulia Chierchia told investors. BP said its oil and gas production will fall by at least one million barrels a day by 2030, a 40% reduction on 2019 levels. The bulk of its annual capital expenditure over the next five years will, however, still be in oil and gas.“We believe that what we are setting out today offers a compelling and attractive long-term proposition for all investors,” CEO Bernard Looney said in a statement.BP’s plan to pivot away from oil after a century of exploration will involve major investments into bioenergy, hydrogen and carbon capture and storage. It is also targeting 70,000 electric vehicle charging points, up from 7,500 at present. At the same time, BP will reduce its oil and gas refining portfolio and aims to raise $25 billion by selling assets over the next five years.BP reported a loss of $16.8 billion for the second quarter, as it wrote down the value of certain assets, including untapped oil and gas reserves, because of reduced forecasts for the price of oil.[Hanna Ziady]More: BP will slash oil production by 40% and pour billions into green energylast_img read more

Running with my little bro

first_imgI’ve been a “Big Brother” with Big Brothers Big Sisters of WNC for over a year now and the experience has been a rewarding one for both myself and my little brother Jordan. Probably a big reason why we were matched together was because of our fondness of sports. To date we have participated in many activities involving some form of exercise, culminating with this past weekend’s 3rd Annual Run for Kid’s Sake 5k on the beautiful Warren Wilson Campus.I signed us both up for this race as the proceeds directly benefit BBBS of WNC. Running together for a great cause and a chance to work up some sweat on a summer morning was too tempting to pass up. Jordan seemed excited about the race prior but race morning he was quieter than normal and probably a little nervous for his first ever 5k. Race morning provided us with nice weather and a great turnout of well over 100 other runners. I also saw several other “bigs” getting ready to run with their “littles”.Jordan and I started off at a nice and controlled pace for the first mile, a perfect way to start a 5k race. Jordan seemed happy, determined and focused. After passing the first mile marker on the Warren Wilson Farm gravel road, we approached an aid station and the trail section of the course along the Swannanoa River. As I looked ahead I saw runners swatting at their legs and backside, immediately I knew what was happening or what was going to happen….bees.As we got to this section I looked over at Jordan and yelled to run this next 50 feet very fast. I didn’t explain why as I knew that could cause a log jam of runners right over the bee’s nest. Well we both got stung in the ankle. However Jordan apparently had never been stung by a bee before as I found out shortly after when asking if he was allergic. He was a real trooper and fought through the initial pain and soon started running once again. Unfortunately I got stuck behind some other runners in a single file line on the narrow trail. Eventually I was able to get around everyone and catch back up to my swift moving friend just before mile 2 on the course.I mentioned to Jordan as we ran together that the last mile was the toughest mile so he would be prepared. We made our way up the last hilly section and I could tell he was getting pretty tired. As I’ve done many times to myself inwardly at races, I told Jordan that we need to really finish strong. He gave me a funny look as if to say “what is wrong with this man?” Anyways he did pick up the pace and had a strong finishing kick. As we rounded the corner to the finish line, Jordan was greeted by several cheering family members who came out to watch him race. He finished 85th overall and he was 2nd in his age group with a great time of 37:29. Not bad at all for his first 5k! It was great to see all the smiles after the finish, especially all the “littles” who probably had just completed their first 5k. 1 2last_img read more

Switchback Results: MTB Trail Damage and Wilderness

first_imgDo mountain bikers damage trails more than other users? Yes: 25%I am a volunteer maintainer for both the Appalachian Trail and a local nature center, neither of which allows bicycles. I can spot bicycle damage immediately, either as knobby tire marks or long skid marks as the rider brakes downhill. Log-jumping produces its own damage as the bottom of the chain abrades the top of the log. Repairs are much more difficult than hiking boot damage or even hiking pole damage. Let bike riders have their own trails and have fun. But they should not be allowed to use hiking trails.—Karl Kunkel, Chicago, Ill.Mountain bikers rival horse packers and four-wheelers for the most damage done to the outdoors. Horse packers and four-wheelers probably don’t care but mountain bikers should.—Mike Boone, Forest City, N.C.No: 75%As a professional trail builder, I find that bikes fall somewhere in the middle. They do more damage than hikers, but less than horses. The impact bikers have on the trail is considerably less than most believe. They also tend to be more involved in trail maintenance.—Jim Davis, Washington, D.C.On hiking trails I see shortcuts and cut-thru trails made by hikers, causing severe erosion. I’ve never seen mountain bikes do that kind of damage.—K, Atlanta, Ga.Trail damage is mostly horse travel and four-wheelers. With IMBA and new and sustainable trail construction, there is less trail damage.—Jim, Denver, Colo.More wilderness: yay or nay? Yes: 88%With increasing urban sprawl I think creating national wilderness areas is essential to preserving what was here originally. We need to put something in the way of their bulldozers.—Brittany, Lynchburg, Va.Wilderness connects wild habitat up the spine of the Appalachians, and it connects us all with our primal, solitary selves.—Ben, Asheville, N.C.Development will continue to encroach on natural areas, unless we designate and zone these areas accordingly. Our most pristine lands are being gated from the public.—Bailey Woods, Easley, S.C.We need wilderness now more than ever. Its preservation is essential to the natural environment, our quality of life, and to future generations.—Fred Jamison, Charlotte, N.C.No: 10%I’m all for preservation of nature, and I know that we could create jobs by doing so. But history has shown that trying to preserve land by interfering with it has been unwise. Look at  Yellowstone’s history of trying to protect the elk by getting rid of wolves, then dealing with the coyote overpopulation by importing wolves from Canada. Nature should be left alone completely, even from protection.—Caleb Jaqua, Charlotte, N.C.Practice what you preach.  I am tired of the purists who decry the fall of a single tree yet purchase items that require many trees to be cut. Where do people think these resources come from?—Ingles Alexander, via e-maillast_img read more