Scars and colour Showbiz brings alive shades of beauty

first_imgNew Delhi: Decades before Deepika Padukone chose to play a girl with an acid-scarred face on the big screen, Zeenat Aman and Rekha essayed strong women with disfigured faces in films, a medium where the heroine has typically lent glamour. The instances may be few and far between, but are welcome at a time when creating an inclusive society is the buzzword. With Chhapaak, director Meghna Gulzar – known for her deft handling of sensitive subjects – has given Deepika a chance to raise the bar for her already versatile filmography by playing an acid attack survivor who looks beyond her scars with “immense courage and strength in the face of crippling adversity”. Also Read – I have personal ambitions now: PriyankaFor Laxmi Agarwal, whose heart-wrenching story has inspired the film, the fact that a star like Deepika not just chose to act in, but also produce such a story, was overwhelming. “I felt, ‘See, they are finding beauty in an acid-burnt face’,” Laxmi said. Interestingly, last year, the British Film Institute (BFI) had announced it would no longer fund movies featuring villains with facial scars. This was in support of an #IAmNotYourVillain campaign by a charity group on a mission to de-stigmatise facial scars in film and television, since scarring has often been used on villains like The Joker and Darth Vader. Beauty has been a big deal in the world of showbiz. But perceptions are changing – or so it seems.last_img

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