National Public Health Week spotlights COVID-19 response

first_img(WBNG) — National Public Health Week comes around once every year, but officials at the Broome County Health Department say this is no normal year. They say with the Covid-19 crisis in full swing the Clinics Division has taken an all hands on deck approach to work toward stopping the spread. This means working to track the movements of individuals who may have been exposed to the disease. “We’ve pulled in staff members from different divisions bringing them up to speed to be able to help support our response,” said Susan Medina, Director of Clinics at the Broome County Heath Department. “We identify cases that are positive, they investigate that and identify any close contacts,” Medina said. “Then we can set them up and contact them and explain what quarantine means and what that will mean for them.” “We had to be vigilant in responding to the ever evolving situation and the information and guidance and making sure we deployed that guidance to the public as we needed to,” she said. “we look at the community as our patient so we really have to have that broad spectrum approach to stop the spread.” “We’re all trying to do what’s right for the community and we are all change agents,” she said “We just need people to stick together, while staying apart.” Acting Deputy Director Mary McFadden says this means sometimes dealing with information that is changing by the minute. In an ever changing and ever evolving pandemic McFadden says the Health Department has one request for the public that they serve every day: last_img read more

Manchester City’s ban from European football overturned

first_img“Whilst Manchester City and its legal advisors are yet to review the full ruling by the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS), the Club welcomes the implications of today’s ruling as a validation of the Club’s position and the body of evidence that it was able to present,” City said in a statement.”The Club wishes to thank the panel members for their diligence and the due process that they administered,” the club added.UEFA said it remained committed to FFP.”UEFA notes that the CAS panel found that there was insufficient conclusive evidence to uphold all of the CFCB’s conclusions in this specific case and that many of the alleged breaches were time-barred due to the 5 year time period foreseen in the UEFA regulations.”Over the last few years, Financial Fair Play has played a significant role in protecting clubs and helping them become financially sustainable and UEFA and ECA [European Club Association] remain committed to its principles.” Manchester City’s two-year suspension from European football was overturned by the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) on Monday, allowing the club to compete in next season’s Champions League.CAS ruled that City did not breach Financial Fair Play (FFP) rules by disguising equity funding as sponsorship. Sport’s highest court also reduced a fine for failing to cooperate with UEFA to 10 million euros ($11.30 million) from 30 million euros.”Most of the alleged breaches reported by the (UEFA) Adjudicatory Chamber of the CFCB (Club Financial Control Body)were either not established or time-barred,” CAS said in a statement. UEFA, European soccer’s governing body, had ruled in February that City had committed serious FFP breaches and failed to cooperate with its investigation.Missing out on the Champions League would have cost City, who have denied any wrongdoing, as much as 100 million pounds ($126.02 million) in prize money and broadcast revenue, as well as matchday and other revenues.The FFP regulations are designed to stop clubs running up big losses through spending on players. They also ensure sponsorship deals are based on their real market value and are genuine commercial agreements — and not ways for owners to pump cash into a club to get around the rules.CAS said its full legal ruling, with details of the case and the decision, would be published in the coming days.center_img Topics :last_img read more

Africa surpasses a million coronavirus cases

first_imgTopics : Algeria Algerians spent a bleak Eid el Adha festival under a strict lockdown that discouraged family visits and banned movement into or out of 29 of the country’s 48 wilayas (prefectures).The nation is the fifth worst-hit in Africa in terms of infections — a surge in the past few weeks has brought the total to over 33,000.Algeria has the continent’s third highest number of fatalities at 1,273, after South Africa and Egypt.The pandemic has taken a huge toll on the country’s economy, which is also facing the collapse of fossil-fuel prices. EgyptEgypt became the first African country to report a coronavirus case on February 14. So far, it has officially registered the continent’s second highest number of cases, with 95,000, including 4,630 deaths. Numbers of daily new infections have recently been falling steadily. From an average of 1,500 previously, new cases plunged below 200 this week.Jihane al-Assal, who heads the government’s anti-coronavirus scientific panel, told a TV talk show “Egypt has passed the peak of the pandemic”.At the weekend she announced the gradual closure of isolation hospitals, while assuring that the government was “preparing” for a potential second wave of the pandemic.However, the country’s health system has been severely strained and came close to “collapsing”, according to the doctors’ union, which recorded at least 134 deaths among its members due to COVID-19.A curfew imposed in March was lifted at the end of June.  Regular domestic and international air traffic resumed on July 1 and tourism, a key income generator for the country, is slowly picking up. The World Health Organization (WHO) said Thursday some countries have recently seen declines of around 20 percent in daily cases but it was too early to confirm this as a trend, while around 10 countries are still experiencing increases.Countries with high infections relative to the size of their populations are South Africa, Djibouti, Gabon, Cape Verde  and Sao Tome and Principe.Here is an overview of key countries: Nigeria Around 45,000 cases have been recorded in Nigeria, Africa’s most populous nation, and more than 900 deaths.In June, the daily caseload rose by between 500 and 800 but latterly has dropped to between 300 and 400.Authorities say they are also gearing for a likely second wave as restrictions are eased. “New rise in cases are to be expected,” said the chief of the presidential task force on COVID-19, Boss Mustapha.Nigeria carries out only 3,000 tests per day, about a tenth of the number in South Africa, which has a much smaller population of 58 million.The epicenter is the commercial hub of Lagos with a population of 20 million. The authorities are loosening lockdown restrictions, allowing churches and mosques to re-open. South Africa The continent’s most industrialized economy has notched up more than 529,000 infections, 53 percent of the continental caseload, and the fifth biggest in the world.The good news is that numbers of daily infections have slightly decreased in recent days to below 10,000 cases compared to an average 12,000 during much of July.Health Minister Zweli Mkhize said on Tuesday that cases in the epicenter, the commercial hub of Gauteng province, appeared to be plateauing. But he warned the risk of a second wave remained: “we are not out of the woods yet”.South Africa imposed one of the world’s toughest lockdowns in March, including a ban on sales of alcohol and cigarettes. The restrictions have been progressively eased since June.The country has some of the best healthcare facilities on the continent, but the World Health Organization (WHO) this week deployed 43 experts to “strengthen” the nation’s response to the pandemic.Among its problems: more than 24,000 health workers have been infected — a tally bigger than the national caseload of many other African countries. Ethiopia Ethiopia, Africa’s second most populous country, has seen a sharp upward trend with infections doubling in less than three weeks in July.It has so far recorded more than 20,000 cases and over 365 deaths.The figures are small relative to a population of 110 million, but the WHO frets unrest sparked by the killing of a pop star from the Oromo ethnic group could further accelerate transmission.The upward spiral is coinciding with mounting signs of virus fatigue.Once-ubiquitous hand-washing stations are becoming scarcer.Hitherto-empty restaurants are filling up, and even some health workers say they are struggling to maintain the same vigilance they had in March.Around three-quarters of all COVID-19 cases in Ethiopia are in the capital Addis Ababa. Coronavirus has now infected more than a million people in Africa, but hopes that the pandemic may be peaking in some countries are also leavened by fear of a second wave.Nations across the continent have recorded 1,000,054 infections and at least 21,724 deaths, accounting for around five percent of global cases, according to an AFP tally as of Thursday.Just five countries account for 75 percent of all cases in Africa, the continent’s health watchdog, the Africa Centers for Diseases Control, says. Zimbabwe Zimbabwe is among the countries where daily infections are steadily rising: numbers of diagnosed cases doubled over 10 days last month and now stand at 4,200, including 81 fatalities.The impoverished country is in a particularly precarious position. The health system is struggling with shortages of basic drugs and equipment, as well as an overburdened and underpaid staff.Nurses countrywide have been on a go-slow for months demanding improved remuneration and coronavirus protective gear. They have since been joined by senior and junior doctors.Burying a minister who died from COVID-19, President Emmerson Mnanagwa pleaded with health workers to act responsibly, promising their grievances will be addressed but not “at the expense of the loss of lives”. “When the pandemic spreads and the death toll rises there are no winners, none at all. We all die,” he said.last_img read more

LBS DG Calls for Collective Efforts on Ebola

first_imgThe Director General of the Liberia Broadcasting System (LBS) Mr. Ledgerhood Rennie, has called on citizens of Montserrado County electoral district #4 to work collectively work together in order to eradicate the killer Ebola virus disease. According to Mr. Rennie, this can be achieved through active community engagements.He made the called Tuesday, January 27, when he served as guest speaker at the launch of the Ebola Community Action Platform (ECAP), held at Baillie Call School in Paynesville.The LBS boss applauded the community for what he termed as excellent efforts so far in the fight against the virus. Mr. Rennie stated that community/citizens’ efforts have led led to the reduction of cases in their communities, yea the country.The program at which Mr. Rennie spoke was held   under the auspices of the People Empowerment Program (PEP) with the theme, “Together We Must Fight to Kick Ebola Out of Liberia.”“Ebola is on the run; no retreat no surrender. Ebola must go! And we must continue to observe all those preventive measures so we can’t have a reoccurrence of the virus in our country,” he stated.The Country Director of Mercy Corps Liberia, Penny Anderson, pledged her organization’s support to working with communities in order to make sure Ebola is eradicated from Liberia.She described the story of Ebola as being one of continued shocks and rebounds, which should make everyone keep alert and vigilant by continually practicing those behaviors that can keep them from contracting the virus.“This is why our valued partners like PEP are playing a critical role by spreading awareness, and reminding people of the need to keep up their guard,” Ms. Anderson said. “Their work will be integral now, as we move into the next phase of the ECAP program, and in the post-Ebola response.“We know that that PEP is among our many committed local partners, who have been working tirelessly to raise awareness of Ebola and help drive it out of your communities.  We are proud to be supporting them as they continue driving this all-important push to free Liberia from Ebola.”She asserted that it is a testament to the strong and continuing efforts of groups like PEP, and of national and local authorities that Ebola is on the decline.The Mercy Corps boss warned against complacency in the fight, adding that, “now more than ever we need to band together to ensure that we can both drive Ebola out of Liberia.The Executive Director of PEP, Richard H. Sieh, among other things, recommended to the Government of Liberia to craft a 10 -year plan that will focus on Ebola orphans and survivors, among others.ECAP is a US$12million social mobilization project funded by USAID and developed by Mercy Corps   to carry out community engagements.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more