Trump Threatens To Force Congress To Adjourn

first_imgTrump said pro forma sessions are a scam and a dereliction of duty. (Washington, DC) — We are four months away from the 2020 Presidential election and the current president still has not gotten more than one hundred appointments past Congress. Many of whom are instrumental in helping the country handle the COVID-19 outbreak.Yesterday, President Trump said he has the authority to force Congress to adjourn so he can make the crucial appointments. In a White House briefing, Trump urged the Senate to stop gaveling-in pro-forma sessions when lawmakers aren’t in town. That would allow him to make recess appointments without those officials being approved by the Senate. Trump railed against the “partisan” obstructionism he said had held up 129 appointments who could all be helping in the coronavirus response.“It’s always roadblocks or a waste of time,” he said. “If the House will not agree to that adjournment, I will exercise my constitutional authority to adjourn both chambers of Congress.”“The current practice of leaving town while conducting phony pro forma sessions is a dereliction of duty that the American people cannot afford during this crisis,” he said.“It is a scam what they do,” Trump said.Pres. Trump threatens to adjourn both chambers of Congress so he can make appointments to fill vacant positions and judicial slots.“If they don’t act on getting these people approved,” Trump says, he will have to do something “that I prefer not doing.” https://t.co/KXv4M8zNFm pic.twitter.com/M9IJLoCzI9— ABC News (@ABC) April 15, 2020last_img read more

FB : SU commit Broyld charged with public lewdness

first_imgAshton Broyld, a Syracuse commit in its incoming class, appeared in court Wednesday on a charge of public lewdness for his actions following a high school basketball game on March 9. He pleaded not guilty to the misdemeanor charge, said Monroe County assistant public defender J.B. Afoh-Manin, who is representing Broyld.‘Our goal is to resolve this case in as fair and expedient way as possible,’ Afoh-Manin said in a phone interview Wednesday evening.According to an article on Wednesday from the Rochester Democrat and Chronicle’s website, Broyld’s charge stems from his actions after Rush-Henrietta’s men’s basketball team lost a playoff game to Irondequoit on March 9.‘The complaint states that Broyld dropped his pants, exposed himself and made lewd gestures and remarks after the game,’ according to the article.Last Saturday, Syracuse held a practice and scrimmage in Rochester, N.Y., at Sahlen’s Stadium. After practice, SU head coach Doug Marrone addressed Broyld’s status. Sue Edson, SU assistant director of athletics for communications, said Wednesday that Marrone’s stance on Broyld has not changed since Saturday.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text‘I’ve talked to Ashton,’ Marrone said after Saturday’s practice. ‘I’ve talked to the family, people at the school. We are well aware of the situation. It is a private matter. We expect Ashton, as well as the rest of our signees, who have work ahead of them to do. But we expect all of them to be a part of Syracuse University in the summer.’Broyld won the New York State Class AA player of the year award in football after helping Rush-Henrietta to a state championship in the Carrier Dome. The quarterback was rated a three-star recruit by Scout.com.Afoh-Manin said he has been in contact with officials at Syracuse, including Kevin Van Derzee, SU director of football operations.‘They just want to be kept abreast of the process of the case,’ Afoh-Manin said about SU. ‘I’ve heard positive feedback from the Syracuse University football program.’According to an article in The Daily Orange published March 29, Broyld apologized for his own actions two weeks ago through a personal statement.Rush-Henrietta released its own statement after the incident, describing the behavior of an unnamed student as ‘completely unacceptable,’ according to the Rochester Democrat and Chronicle article.Afoh-Manin said the 19-year-old Broyld has no criminal history, and this is the first criminal charge in his life. He said the next step for Broyld will be a pretrial conference, which will take place April 27.‘We expect this case to be resolved in fair fashion,’ Afoh-Manin said. ‘We’re not looking to seek any personal treatment. We’re just looking for fair treatment for my client.’mcooperj@syr.edu Comments Facebook Twitter Google+center_img Published on March 30, 2011 at 12:00 pm Contact Mark: mcooperj@syr.edu | @mark_cooperjrlast_img read more

Genocide survivor talks about experience, research

first_imgKosal Path, a survivor of Cambodian genocide under the Khmer Rouge, spoke Tuesday at the USC Gould School of Law about the experiences of growing up in the country and his present research on social rehabilitation after mass killings.The genocide, which occurred between 1975 and 1979, left about 1.7 million people dead at the hands of the Khmer Rouge regime headed by Pol Pot. The genocide targeted several minority groups, including ethnic and ancestral Chinese, Vietnamese and Thai Cambodians.According to Path, Cambodians are still feeling the repercussions today. Though Path said he does not remember much from his childhood, he said he does remember not having any food. Path also remembers that his family members were forced to become refugees in Vietnam.“People were tormented so they are not ready to face it,” he said. “It will take them time to communicate about restoring relationships between the two communities.”After surviving the genocide, Path graduated from Phnom Penh University in Cambodia and received a master’s degree and a Ph.D. at USC in international relations. During his presentation, Plath said of USC that despite his origins, he “feel[s] at home here.” Path currently serves as a lecturer in the USC School of International Relations and a USC Shoah Foundation Fellow.During the event, Path talked about the criminal cases involving the Khmer Rouge and said the fact that survivors were questioning the convicts in the courtroom sends a “powerful message.”The nation still holds so much anger towards the genocide, according to Path, that many participate in “Anger Day” on May 20 each year, where people express their anger about the genocide and visit the memorial.Path said criminals from the Khmer Rouge first attempted to blame the genocide on Vietnam and then on each other.Natasha Immaraj, a graduate student studying public policy, said that she thought the discussion of guilt was the most interesting part of Path’s talk.“The blame game is so typical of human nature,” she said. “They first blame the Vietnamese and then each other.”The event also included a presentation from Hannah Garry, president of USC Law International Human Rights Clinic. Garry spoke about her involvement in a criminal case concerning the massacres.Under the supervision of Garry, students traveled to Cambodia to assist in the conviction of the criminals responsible for the genocide.In her presentation, Garry showed pictures of the genocide memorial and torture chambers in addition to  talking about the work the students did on the criminal cases.Maggie Buckles, a law student who is in the International Human Rights Clinic, said that she attended the event to get a human perspective on a conflict she learned about from a technical and legal perspective.“Seeing how society has transformed and how much work there is left to do makes the work we’re doing for the tribunals seem really important,” Buckles said. “It’s motivational.”During the event, Path emphasized the importance of continuing to explore about genocide.“Seventy percent of the [current] population was born after the genocide,” Path said. “I think children should have an active memory of what happened.”last_img read more