Criminal Lawyer Jason Doe Solves: The Case of the Money Lover

first_imgCharacters in this StoryJason Doe – defense counsel who knew there was the truth somewhereJanet Dagoseh – she was facing a preliminary hearing to establish her role in her husband’s deathDaniel Sackor – the judge who was affable in his demeanorJoshua Sackor – the prosecutor who told the defense: ‘Your witness…’Sam Weah – who was accused but claimed he was innocentSamson Dagoseh – the decedent (deceased) whose death linked his wife, who linked the accusedDorcas Soko – the woman whose name ended proceedingsA triumphant atmosphere filled the courtroom as Judge Daniel Sackor entered at 9 a.m. for the June 5 sitting with an air of affability, bordered on many years of judging criminal cases. The defendant, Janet Dagoseh was facing a preliminary hearing in a case in which she was denying culpability in the death of her husband by fire, an incident that occurred in central Monrovia, on May 25.State prosecutor Joshua Sackor walked his client through the night of the incident, to establish her innocence.“How long had you been married?”“We had been married for ten years.”“And he was a wonderful man?”“Yes, he was a man of my heart.”“Did you have any reason to kill your husband?”The defendant hesitated, wiping her eyes with a handkerchief, and gave a deep breath before adjusting her position on the witness stand: “This question has been thrown at me by many. The truth is I had no reason to kill my husband of ten years. And if anybody thinks there is any reason, let them prove it.”“Like all human relations, marriage has its ups and downs; and that, I think, is normal. That would not give me cause to hurt another human being…let alone my wonderful husband.”“Thank you,” the defense counsel said, as he walked towards his bench. He searched through documents on the table and after a couple of seconds, made three steps towards the defendant. With an unmistakable air of triumph, he solicited: “Tell us about the night your husband died, Mrs. Dagoseh.”The courtroom remained silent.“It was the night that I wish I had not lived to hear about,” she was barely audible, and the spectators in the courtroom leaned forward.“I had left the house about 6pm for choir practice. The church is located in Sinkor, and I rode a motorbike for the almost twenty-five minute ride. Practice ended about 7:30pm. There was a meeting that caused me to stay a little longer so I did not leave the church until about 8:30 p.m.”“By 9:00 p.m., I was nearing the Benson and Gurley Streets intersection when I saw the huge fire, the defendant Sam Weah coming from the house, along with lots of people, hurrying in the direction of the well-lit sky. Others milled about. I overheard their conversation about the fire which had killed a man they claimed was drunk in his bed.”“I did not think about any danger to me or whether Mr. Weah had anything to do with the fire till I got closer to the house when a neighbor met me and wondered how I managed to survive the fire.” She halted and wiped the tears from her eyes.She continued, “I came to myself about 30 minutes later in a hospital bed, because I had fainted. It was after I had been told of my husband’s death that rumors began to sweep across the community that I was apparently involved in my husband’s death since I was not killed in the incident.”“I am a broken woman and tired of life after losing my husband and the only house my parents left for me. My parents died in a blazing fire in 2009; I was the only survivor…” her voice broke again, and there were murmurs of sympathy from the audience.“When Weah saw me,” she continued, “he began to run through the large crowd of people.”“Your witness,” the prosecutor said, turning to defense counsel Jason Doe. It was clear that the woman’s testimony, along with previous ones, suggests circumstantial overtones that Sam Weah could have something to do with the blaze. However, Jason Doe knew there was too much for Mrs. Dagoseh to gain from her husband’s death, but to blame it on another, an innocent man, was hardly the way to do it.The accused did not factor too much in the prosecution’s deliberations with Mrs. Dagoseh but it was apparent that Judge Sackor had drawn up some conclusions. Nonetheless, the lawyer knew he now had the trump card to burst the case wide open. From closer observation of proceedings, he knew there was something fishy and he would chase whatever it was to ensure justice not only for his client, but for the man whose charred body was discovered after the blaze.The lawyer decided to ignore certain portions of the case and concentrate on the most pertinent points that could give any woman, the greedy type, the unholy belief that she could do away with her husband and turn around to enjoy the loot.As the lawyer approached the witness, he turned momentarily to the accused, whose eyes were filled with tears. The lawyer knew Weah had been a frequent visitor to the decedent’s house, as it was brought out in previous hearings, and it was clear that Mrs. Dagoseh was a cunning, coldhearted woman of steel. The lawyer swept his head away from the accused with a reassuring smile and strolled towards the witness.The courtroom tensed as ceiling and standing fans hummed, overshadowing the spectators with the afternoon breeze.Janet Dagoseh lifted herself as if to say, “I’m ready Jason, go ahead,” regained her composure, rolled her eyes, and threw her head back as defense counsel Jason Doe stood before her.A temporary silence followed which unnerved her, and unable to withstand the silence, she called for the tears that had been her companion since her husband died in the blazing fire that consumed two other houses, and had rendered her homeless.“Your parents died in a fire disaster in 2009?”“Yes.”“You were the only survivor?”“Yes.”“Your husband, or rather your late husband Samson Dagoseh worked for the United Consulting Company?”“Yes,” she said, “he was an accountant.”“He worked there for ten years?”“And you are aware that he had an insurance policy that says at his death you, his wife, would benefit from a life insurance amount of US$100,000?”The prosecutor was on his feet, “Leading the witness; what is the relevance of this line of questioning, Your Honor?”Judge Sackor lowered his eyeglasses and said, “Will the state prosecutor please tell us the point of this question?”“Your Honor,” Jason Doe said, “I am trying to establish a motive for murder. I am aware of the issue of relevance and the court will agree that the defendant has had a history of a fire incident that claimed her parents, leaving to her benefit a sizable amount when she had just married the decedent…”“Very well,” Judge Sackor said, “you may continue.”“Thank you, Your Honor,” Jason Doe said, and turning to the defendant, said: “You are supposed to earn 100,000 United States dollars as an insurance benefit from your husband’s death?”“Yes,” she said, lowering her head.“The last time you had a similar experience, which was in 2009, besides the house that you inherited, you received an insurance benefit of 175,000 United States dollars?”“Yes.”“At the time you had just married the decedent?”“Yes.”“You told the court that on the day of the tragic fire incident, on May 25, you went to choir practice in Sinkor and you arrived home around 9 p.m.?”“Yes.”Jason Doe, in an exciting tone, said, “We are in the raining season, Mrs. Dagoseh?”“Yes,” she said, “but the rains are not falling every day.”“But on May 25, how was the rain on that day?”“It did not rain that much.”“On the night the fire killed your husband, how much fell?”“I cannot remember.”“But you remember that you went to choir practice?”“I don’t miss choir practice.”“Yes, you don’t. But the day fire killed your husband you went to choir practice; you can only remember that you went to choir practice and not how much rain fell that day?”“Yes.”“What did you tell your friend Dorcas Soko, who visited you at the hospital the day after the fire killed your husband?”The defendant appeared surprised at the question and stared at the prosecutor.“I spoke to her as a friend.”“What did you say to Mrs. Soko when she told you that she believed you were bewitched, making reference to your past experience when your parents died? Remember you are under oath.”“I did not mean what I said.”“Tell the court what you said to Mrs. Soko.”Suddenly, the defendant slumped down in her chair, out of the spectators’ view. The bailiff, sheriff deputies and several police officers rushed forward to help. Judge Sackor readjusted himself on the bench and with a grin, beckoned the defense and the prosecutor to have a conference in his chambers.But before that the judge picked up his gavel and struck twice, announcing the adjournment of the case.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Overlooker

first_imgI’m a young man of twentyseven years. I’m concerned citizen who hails from The Eastern Cape but I’m in gauteng.As I was watching the world and our country fighting against xenophobia it came to my concern that why cnt I start my organisation in helping the government to fight this campaign of fighting this underage/illegal circumcision in our beautiful country as it is getting out of hand.The department is doing its best but it’s still extending so it’s my wish to play my part and work with the government as an overlooker whenever it’s being performed around the country.So I’m pleading with this organisation and the health department to help me play my part in our beatiful country as our brothers are dying every season. Let us unite in arms maAfrica.Blakie masixole.Name: Masixole BlakieEmail address: xambablakie01@gmail.com Telephone: 073 265 0691last_img read more

World Cup: American dream falls short after 2-1 loss to Belgium

first_imgKevin De Bruyne celebrates after Belgium’s 2-1 win over USA in the Round of 16 tie They captured the eyes and hearts of a suddenly awakened soccer nation, who gathered in unprecedented numbers to watch the world’s game.Statistical Highlights | Match Photos But the end of the ride came at the exact same point as four years ago: with an overtime loss in the World Cup’s round of 16.Kevin De Bruyne finally beat goalkeeper Tim Howard in the third minute of extra time, Romelu Lukaku scored 12 minutes later to give Belgium a two-goal lead, and the Red Devils hung on for a 2-1 victory Tuesday.”It’s heartbreaking,” Howard said. “I don’t think we could have given it more.”Before exiting, the US showed the spunk that captured America’s attention. Julian Green, at 19 the youngest player on the US roster, stuck out his right foot to volley in Michael Bradley’s pass over the defense in the 107th minute, two minutes after entering the game.They nearly tied it up in the 114th, when Clint Dempsey peeled off the ball and was stopped point-blank by goalkeeper Thibaut Courtois after being fed by Bradley on a free kick.But it wasn’t enough, and U.S. players fell to the field at the final whistle in their all-white uniforms like so many crumpled tissues.”You get to this point and these games are always about a play here and play there,” Bradley said.The Americans advanced from a difficult first-round group that included Germany, Portugal and Ghana to reach the knockout rounds of consecutive World Cups for the first time. Four years ago, they were eliminated in South Africa by Ghana 1-0 on a goal in the third minute of overtime.advertisementFans who had made the trek south of the equator chanting “I believe that we will win!” could hardly believe they lost, extending a World Cup winless streak against European nations to nine games over 12 years.The crowd of 51,227 at Arena Fonte Nova appeared to be about one third pro-U.S., with 10 percent backing the Belgians and the rest neutral. Back home, millions watched across the United States in offices, homes and public gatherings that includes a huge crowd in Chicago’s Soldier Field.At some large financial firms in Manhattan, 70-inch screens were brought in for employees to watch. President Barack Obama joined about 200 staffers in an Executive Office Building auditorium to watch the second half.”I believe!” he exclaimed as he walked in at the front of the hall. “I believe!”That sparked a chorus of the chant, and as Obama took a front-row seat, he said sheepishly: “I was worried that if I walked in and Belgium scored, I’d get in trouble.”Howard, playing the finest game of his career, stopped a dozen shots with his legs and arms to keep the Americans even through regulation and force an additional 30 minutes. He wound up with 16 saves.In its first World Cup under Jurgen Klinsmann, the U.S. had promised to play attacking soccer. But once again the Americans had trouble maintaining possession and for much of the night it seemed as if the field were tilted.Howard, at 35 one of the American veterans, kept saving his team.But when Matt Besler lost his balance on an attack down the right, Lukaku sped in alone and crossed in front of the goal. The ball rebounded off a defender, and De Bruyne controlled it, spun and beat Howard just over his right foot.Then with the U.S. pushing for an equalizer, De Bruyne burst ahead and fed Lukaku. He slotted the ball past Howard, his Everton teammate, seeming to put the Red Devils out of reach.But Green, among five German-Americans on the U.S. roster and a surprise pick, woke up the team and its fans with his first touch of the game, setting off raucous chants of “U-S-A! U-S-A!” But there would be no final comeback this time.Chris Wondolowski had a chance to win it in stoppage time when Jermaine Jones flicked the ball to him at the top of the 6-yard box, but with Courtois coming out Wondolowski put the ball over the crossbar.”The dream falls short, but this is an incredible group,” Howard said, “and we’ll never forget this night.”Team Lineups(from):Belgium: Thibaut Courtois; Toby Alderweireld, Daniel Van Buyten, Vincent Kompany, Jan Vertonghen; Axel Witsel, Marouane Fellaini, Kevin De Bruyne, Dries Mertens (Kevin Mirallas, 60th), Eden Hazard (Nacer Chadli, 111th); Divock Origi (Romelu Lukaku, 91st)advertisementUnited States: Tim Howard; Fabian Johnson (DeAndre Yedlin, 32nd), Matt Besler, Omar Gonzalez, DaMarcus Beasley, Geoff Cameron; Michael Bradley, Jermaine Jones, Alejandro Bedoya (Julian Green, 105th, injury time), Graham Zusi (Chris Wondolowski, 72nd); Clint Dempseylast_img read more