Identify your role in fight against HIV/Aids – Dr Rhonda Moore

first_imgAs Guyana marks more than 25 years in the fight against HIV/AIDS, Guyanese are being encouraged to identify their roles in the battle.The call came from Programme Manager of the National AIDS Programme Secretariat (NAPS), Dr Rhonda Moore, at a ‘World AIDS Day’ walk on Saturday morning.Representatives of Rong-An Inc. joined by the 13th Chinese Medical Team and officials in Kwakwani during the outreach“Do you see your role as a valuable contribution, or is it a lifetime commitment to ending HIV/AIDS? The goal is to end AIDS by 2030,” Dr. Moore said.She observed that dedication and hard work are necessary if the goal of eliminating HIV/AIDS within 12-13 years is to be achieved.Dr Moore reported that 2016 statistics show that, worldwide, there are 21 million persons living with HIV/AIDS who have access to treatment. Guyana has an estimated 8,492 persons living with HIV.“Sixty-nine per cent of those persons knew that they have HIV. Of those who knew their status, 84 per cent were on treatment; and of those who access treatment, 68 per cent achieved virus suppression,” Dr Moore detailed.The NAPS Programme Manager further noted: “The National AIDS Programme Secretariat will this year celebrate 25 years in fighting against HIV/AIDS.”  However, she said, work still needs to be done to reduce stigma and discrimination while creating an enabling environment for persons to access care and treatment.Dr. Moore emphasised it is crucial that this service is sustained.According to the Department of Public Information, hundreds attended the Health Walk, which was a collaboration between the National AIDS Programme Secretariat and several public health agencies and international developmental partners. The exercise culminated at the Square of the Revolution with a brief interfaith programmeWorld AIDS Day will be observed on December 1, 2017, under the theme ‘My Health, My Right’last_img read more

Researchers claim a third of dinosaurs might never have existed

first_img Explore further Jack Horner, of Montana State University, said in a new documentary to be aired on the National Geographic channel, that one example was the Nanotyrannus, which was identified as a separate species but which may in fact be a juvenile Tyrannosaurus Rex, whose skull changed dramatically as it matured, becoming much less elongated. This was suggested after a dinosaur mid-way between the size of a Nanotyrannus and Tyrannosaurus Rex was discovered. According to Horner, Nanotyrannus, which had 17 teeth in the lower jaw, was in fact a juvenile T. Rex, which had 12 lower-jaw teeth. The newly discovered dinosaur had 14 teeth in the lower jaw. Horner suggests that as the Tyrannosaurus Rex grew, it lost its small, blade-like teeth for larger bone-crushers.The researchers also studied late Cretaceous fossils of Triceratops found in the Hell Creek formation in eastern Montana. These dinosaurs had died at various ages, and their fossils revealed a number of changes as the animals grew. The skulls revealed the juveniles’ horns curved backwards, while the adults’ horns pointed forwards, while the bones around the frill flattened and lengthened as the dinosaur matured.Another researcher, Mark Goodwin, of the University of California in Berkeley, explained that they had been able to obtain a better growth series than had been available before, and this enabled them to document the changes occurring during the growth of the animals. Big changes in the body from infancy to adulthood may have been occurred for similar reasons to changes that occur in species today that ensure members of a species recognize each other and can distinguish between adults and juveniles needing protection.Not all paleontologists are convinced by the study. Paleontologist Hans-Dieter Sues, of the National Museum of Natural History in Washington DC agreed that some dinosaurs identified as separate species may turn out to be juveniles, since many vertebrates change in appearance as they mature. But the conclusions of the study are controversial and the claim that about a third have been misidentified is exaggerated, according to Sues. Testing the hypotheses is also difficult because there are not enough available fossils.The research is featured in a National Geographic documentary entitled “Dinosaurs Decoded”.© 2009 PhysOrg.com This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. (PhysOrg.com) — A new ten-year study by US paleontologists suggests that up to a third of dinosaur fossils may have been incorrectly identified as new species, when they are actually juveniles of species in which there was a dramatic change as they developed. Tyrannosaurus rex may have been scavenger Citation: Researchers claim a third of dinosaurs might never have existed (2009, October 13) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2009-10-dinosaurs.html Tyrannosaurus rex, a theropod from the Late Cretaceous of North America, pencil drawing. Image: Wikipedia.last_img read more