College students to perform two operas

first_imgSaint Mary’s College will look to hit the right note this weekend as six students perform two short operas this weekend. The performances of “The Old Maid and the Thief” and “The Telephone,” both by Gian Carlo Menotti, will showcase the talents of students involved in a one-credit opera workshop, associate professor of music Laurel Thomas said. “In the semesters we do opera workshop, students can receive one credit for taking the class,” she said. “The term ‘opera workshop’ is used quite loosely, in the sense that we might do a one-act opera in its entirety, or we might do several scenes from different operas, which is how the term is usually used.” Thomas said the College presents a staged musical performance each year within the music department, with the exception of every fourth year, where the College teams the music and theatre departments to create a full-length musical. “Every fourth year we do a large musical together,” she said. “We are currently in discussion about doing a smaller musical every other year, and we tried this last fall when we collaborated to produce ‘Into the Woods’ by Stephen Sondheim.” Thomas said she is responsible for selecting music each year that caters to the students’ skill set. “I always choose the opera or opera scenes based on the students in the department who are musically capable and interested in working hard on a production,” she said. Thomas said the operas she selected this year are comical, and will showcase each performer’s talent. “I hope that people will enjoy the music, find the singing of high quality, but mostly, that they will be able to laugh and have fun,” she said. “The Telephone” runs about 20 minutes long and is about a female character, Lucy, who is on the telephone with Ben, who is trying to propose to her. “It is an earlier case of a problem we still have today — technology getting in the way of true communication,” Thomas said. The plot of “The Old Maid and the Thief” reflects the history of 1930s — the era in which it was written. “‘The Old Maid and the Thief’ reflects Menotti’s view of this town and its inhabitants,” she said. “Though it is a comedy, the female roles in this opera are not necessarily all likeable. It was the first opera written for radio broadcast, another indication of its era.” The operas will be held on Friday and Saturday at 7:30 p.m. in the Little Theatre in Moreau Hall. Tickets are free for students and cost $10 for adults, $8 for senior citizens and $8 for faculty and staff of the University of Notre Dame, Saint Mary’s College and Holy Cross College.last_img read more

Notre Dame named to Forbes 2012 top college list

first_imgMembers of the Notre Dame community have long been aware of the University’s continual growth and rise to prominence as a national research university, but now the financial world is taking note as well. Earlier this month, business magazine Forbes ranked Notre Dame No. 12 on its 2012 list of America’s top colleges and universities. According to Forbes.com, this holistic ranking is based on information gathered from five general categories: postgraduate success, student satisfaction, debt, four-year graduation rate and competitive awards. Associate Vice President for Undergraduate Enrollment Don Bishop said the Forbes ranking methodology uses “reality-based outcomes” to measure the quality of American colleges and universities. “Forbes is a financial expert, so not surprisingly, they tend to look at outcomes in what your costs were for going to a school, the productivity of that school in graduation and student satisfaction and the actual success – not perception or prestige – five, 10, 20 years out after graduation,” Bishop said. “It is gratifying that Notre Dame rises even higher in that more realistic, outcomes-based approach.” Bishop said he believes Notre Dame fared well in Forbes’s ranking due to a correspondence between the values outlined in the ranking methodology and those of the University. “We tend to have the same values that Forbes seems to identify, such as the quality of undergraduate education, student access to faculty and the feeling that students are getting attention and inspiration from that faculty,” Bishop said. “We don’t intend to overuse rankings, but this particular ranking is more thoughtful and robust, and when we discuss where Notre Dame’s strengths lie, a lot of attributes [Forbes] articulates, we articulate.” Because the list includes both national research universities and liberal arts colleges, Notre Dame ranked eighth among its research university peers and No. 12 overall. This ranking places the University ahead of half the institutions in the Ivy League as well. “We think that’s a fair assessment,” Bishop said. “This ranking is a very useful tool for Notre Dame because it places us in a more advantaged situation in conversations with students to talk about the benefits of the University. Now you have an external source recognizing that and placing a high value on it, too.” One of those “Notre Dame benefits” acknowledged by the Forbes ranking is the University’s emphasis on financial support for students and its impact on the pool of students applying to Notre Dame, Bishop said. “We think financial support is important in lowering debt, and improvements in our financial aid over the last decade have moved Notre Dame up,” he said. “We’re now getting students to enroll that may not have enrolled 10 years ago because of our more supportive financial aid. That’s a strength that’s only going to get stronger.” The increased financial support for students in recent years has been facilitated by the simultaneous growth of the University’s endowment, which Bishop said now ranks in the top 10 among private universities, compared with its top-15 ranking 15 years ago. “We’re moving up in the success of the University due to the support provided by alumni and the general public,” Bishop said. “We also just completed a $2 billion alumni donation campaign last year, which was a historic accomplishment.” The growth of Notre Dame’s endowment has also allowed the University to invest more heavily in its faculty and campus facilities, Bishop said. “We have one of the top faculty cohorts in the country, and Notre Dame continues to invest in a stronger faculty each year,” he said. “The quality of the faculty and the access students have to that faculty has been a major investment in the last 10 to 15 years that’s only getting stronger each year.” Bishop said the combination of those three factors – faculty, financial aid and facilities – contribute to both the University’s growing reputation and its commitment to providing students with the best education possible. “Not only are we very good at raising money, but we’re very good at investing that money and getting a higher return, which means we can provide better facilities, faculty and aid,” Bishop said. “When you have those three things going your way, you’re going to keep making up ground on others as long as you know where you’re headed.” Although national college rankings like those of Forbes are generally held in esteem by much of the American public, Bishop said the University strives to “be a better Notre Dame” that holds true to its mission, rather than evolving into a “generic” top 10 university. “Notre Dame has a vision of where it’s headed in terms of mission … It is not driven by outside rankings. It’s driven by the belief that it’s our responsibility to get better every year in many different ways,” he said. “More importantly, we value a sense of obligation and service to others. We’re not here just to be No. 1 for our own benefit, but the more successful we are, the more we can serve others successfully, and people believe that here.” Despite the high financial costs of attending Notre Dame and Forbes’s focus on the economic value of a college education, Bishop said he believes enrolling in the University proves to be a “good return on a very expensive investment” in the long run. “Notre Dame has a very strong sense of mission and focus along with expanding resources that make us a better value today than when we charged much less some time ago,” he said. “Yes, it’s more expensive, but it’s worth a lot more.” Overall, Bishop said the Forbes ranking will further the University’s national reputation and attract high-quality applicant pools in the future, but it should not take away from Notre Dame’s unique character. “[The Forbes ranking] improves the conversation, but it should not dominate the conversation. It still needs to be about the unique benefits of Notre Dame,” Bishop said. “We’re No. 1 at who we are, so we need to get students who care about that.”last_img read more

Candidates debate domestic policy

first_imgPresident Barack Obama and Gov. Mitt Romney debated domestic policy Wednesday evening in the first of three presidential debates during an evening that seemed to focus more on style than substance at the University of Denver. In a reversal of the usual pattern, Romney’s poised, polished performance seemed to outshine Obama’s lackluster appearance, political science professor Michael Zuckert said. “Romney knew exactly how he wanted to put things and he put them pithily, he put them smartly and sharply ⎯ he was very smooth,” Zuckert said. “Obama was still looking for words and ways to formulate things … He should have had better formulations right at hand that he could have relied on and spoken more forcefully, instead of groping around for ways to express things that he could have had on the tip of his tongue.” This impressive showing from Romney won him the debate, at least stylistically, Zuckert said. “In terms of overall impression, Romney carried a lot of the debate, but in terms of issues, I think Obama carried it,” Zuckert said. “I saw the polls afterward and they said that they thought Romney could handle the economy better, that Romney could handle jobs better.” The thermometer measuring audience reaction on the bottom of the CNN broadcast of the debate seemed to indicate that the audience was reacting more to style than substance, Zuckert said. “It isn’t clear to me how much of the content of what they actually said made an impression, but I do think that style counts a lot,” Zuckert said. “That’s an example of why rhetoric is important – people react more to the impressions things leave on them rather than the substance of what is there … and the impression in this performance was that Romney is ‘presidential.’” Film, Television and Theatre professor Susan Ohmer said Romney’s structured answers helped him retain attention. “It was striking to me that he numbered his points,” Ohmer said. “That’s a strategy that you see in formal debate that helps keep listeners organized – a very smart strategy on [former] Governor Romney’s part.” Moderator Jim Lehrer, executive editor and former news anchor of PBS news hour, told the candidates that the debate would be divided into six units of 15 minutes, each structured around different focal points. The first question asked the candidates to speak to their plans to create jobs, which focused the debate on differences between two disparate plans to stimulate the economy. Economics professor Eric Sims said this beginning gave Romney a lot of momentum starting the debate. “I think people vote with their pocketbooks,” Sims said. “People want to ask the question ‘Are you better off now than you were four years ago?’ and I don’t think many people can say yes to that question – the president is taking a hit for that.” Rarely has an incumbent candidate been reelected to the presidency after presiding over a downturn in the economy, Sims said. “Historically speaking it is surprising that a president would be running this well with the economy in this shape,” Sims said. “To be fair it is hard to tell how responsible President Obama is or is not for that… he did walk into a bad situation but it is very unusual that we are in a recession and he is polling so well.” Both candidates have very different visions on how to solve the jobs problem, but Romney’s points were more salient because he was able to put Obama on the defensive, Sims said. The president failed to refocus the discussion of the economic progress and job creation during his term as an analysis on improvement, rather than focusing on its current status, Zuckert said. “Bill Clinton gave Obama a script that he could have used more effectively on that issue, and though Obama did try, he didn’t push it as forcefully as he might have done as a ‘Look where we started from and look where we are type of thing’ as opposed to ‘Look where we are at the absolute moment,’” Zuckert said. “Obama didn’t emphasize the trends, some of the trends are not great but they’re better than Romney portrayed them.” Zuckert said the focus on the economy played right into Romney’s hands. “Criticism of Obama on unemployment is still Romney’s best technique, but I’ve been waiting to hear more details about how he would actually change [unemployment],” Zuckert said. “I just haven’t heard a policy to me that sounds persuasive enough yet, to me it’s just not enough detail.” Romney was able to contrast his experience with business and economic policy with the relative lack of progress made in those areas in the past four years, Sims said. “That’s Obama’s weakest point. Barack Obama has a lot of pluses: he’s very likeable, at least four years ago he brought this attitude of hope and change to Washington, but the reality is that the economy stinks,” Sims said. “I think this was playing to Romney’s wheelhouse, domestic and economic policy: That’s where he has experience… In their discussion Romney came across as having a very good grasp of economics, in contrast I thought the President looked a little timid at times.” One of the strongest points Romney made was a criticism of the timing of Obama’s health care law, Sims said. “Romney’s point was that he was surprised that Obama was going to move this healthcare reform through [Congress] so fast right in the middle of an economic downturn, and that though we do need that kind of legislation – some kind of healthcare reform in the long term – when the real issue should have been jobs, President Obama was pushing through healthcare reform that created a lot of uncertainty,” Sims said. “Uncertainty is not conducive to a healthy labor market on both ends.” Ohmer said the differences in policy between Romney and Republican vice presidential nominee Paul Ryan were highlighted during the debate and by the work of fact checkers after the debate. “Ryan has endorsed legislation that will [end] Pell Grants, while Romney has said he wouldn’t do that,” Ohmer said. “Romney has also said that he won’t cut five trillion dollars when fact checkers said he would.” The degree to which each candidate moved toward the middle was striking, Zuckert said. “Even though people have said the issues were really strongly defined, they moved back towards each other,” Zuckert said. “Romney did maybe more than Obama, but both did substantially: Obama did in his litany about small businesses and job creation, and Romney in how he tailored his position from what we have heard before.” The fundamental difference between the candidates is the role that each envisions for the government within the economy, Sims said. “They characterize each other as free market capitalism and socialism, but on the broad level it is really that one side wants less government intervention and more power and choice in the hands of the individual, while the other side wants more government involvement – I think at the end of the day that’s the main difference here,” Sims said. The debate has changed America’s perception of the choice to make in November, Sims said. “Last night Romney came across as in control of the debate, and looked presidential: He helped himself a lot,” Sims said. “I think the Obama camp will have a different strategy next time around … as they move away from domestic policy to foreign policy it will be interesting to watch – we have a much closer race today than we did 24 hours ago.”last_img read more

Irish economist spurs Irish patriotism

first_imgAccording to Irish economist and author David McWilliams, one solution to Ireland’s recent economic problems may come from the Irish but not from Ireland, it would come from what he calls the “great Irish tribe.” McWilliams gave a lecture titled, “Ireland, Europe and the Irish Diaspora – Re-imagining Ireland in the 21st Century,” in the Rare Book Room of the Hesburgh Library on Friday. McWilliams said Ireland’s current economic turmoil amidst the general problems of the Eurozone requires something drastic, but he believes this solution could be provided by the people worldwide who identify themselves as Irish. “The future of Ireland needs another shock, and that’s where you come in, where the diaspora comes in,” McWilliams said. He said the possibility of enlisting the self-identified Irish in places like the United States, Canada and Australia first came to his mind due to the comment of a mentor. McWilliams said he was assigned a very experienced Israeli mentor while working for a Swiss bank in Israel. One day, this mentor said he noticed that he dealt with many ethnically Irish people when working with American companies and asked McWilliams whether or not the Irish had any mechanism for bringing these people back to Ireland. McWilliams said he hadn’t given the subject much thought before then, but he didn’t think there was any such effort. “We’ve done nothing but repel the tribe as far as I can tell,” he said. McWilliams said he has since begun working on various projects to make use of the Irish overseas and his reason for coming to Notre Dame was to propose his ideas. “[Notre Dame] is an incredibly powerful place to start these projects. Notre Dame is a huge resource for the Irish in America and a brilliant center for Irish connections. You can use Notre Dame to champion some of the ideas and feed into its network of alumni,” he said. “This could be a huge project which Notre Dame could be involved in.” McWilliams said there are three elements of his overall proposal, a program resembling the “Birthright Israel” program, allowing Irish ex-patriots to vote in national elections and reaching out to the ethnically Irish based on town records. McWilliams said during his time in Israel he learned about the birthright program, which provides free 10-day educational trips to Israel for Jewish young adults from 60 different countries. McWilliams said he is hoping to create a similar program for Irish young adults. The goal of the program is to instill a strong emotional connection with Ireland and their Irish heritage in the young adults, McWilliams said.”Emotional things that happen to you as a kid stick with you. Imagine as an American what it would mean to visit Ireland when you’re 15,” McWilliams said. McWilliams said he has seen Polish, Italian, American and other ex-patriot groups line-up to vote in their nation’s elections while living overseas. Similarly enfranchising Irish citizens who are living abroad could help to alleviate problems of provisionalism and clientalism present in current Irish politics, he said. McWilliams said those who have lived abroad for a while might have a better perspective on what is good for the Irish nation as a whole. McWilliams said he is also leading an effort to use town records and town gossips to trace the emigration stories of the world’s ethnically Irish and then reaching out to them with their own history. “We can email you, everyone’s contactable nowadays, with a Google Maps image of the specific field from which your relative emigrated from Ireland,” he said. “With tech we can bring all this together.” McWilliams said this idea that Ireland ought to do more to engage the ethnically Irish of the world, his “diaspora strategy,” was not initially as well received as it is now. He said the idea progressed through the three stages of reception from “open ridicule” to “violent opposition” to “everyone claims they were already on your side.” “The idea was fist considered risible, something to be laughed at, but now everyone has a diaspora strategy,” he said. McWilliams said this effort could be very successful because Ireland has one of the best “brand” names in the world, but it all depends on the cooperation of the Irish diaspora. “The power of the diaspora can be forged to improve the ‘product’ of Ireland, a country with the most powerful ‘brand’ in the world because every member of the diaspora is a salesperson for the ‘brand,’” he said. “We can only do this if we work together.”last_img read more

Bread of Life Dinner discusses pregnant students

first_imgNotre Dame’s Center for Ethics and Culture hosted its semi-annual Bread of Life Dinner Tuesday evening in the Morris Inn. Senior Erin Stoyell-Mulholland who helped plan and run the event, said the dinner is an opportunity for undergraduate and graduate students to interact with faculty and have conversations about issues related to the protection and support of life in the context of a brief lecture. Tuesday’s lecture featured speaker was Erin Hoffmann Harding, vice president for student affairs, who spoke on the topic of “Promoting a Culture of Life at Notre Dame.”Hoffmann Harding said she wanted to start by dispelling the notion that Notre Dame imposes disciplinary action on pregnant students — a myth she said she has heard repeated by many people across campus from students to hall staff.“This issue is one of our biggest challenges and something I am particularly passionate about,” Hoffmann Harding said.Hoffmann Harding said Notre Dame offers a wide variety of tools to help with planned and unplanned pregnancies, in particular designated pregnancy support advocates, a pregnant and parenting student assistance fund and educational online resources.“As a Catholic university, Notre Dame is committed to life and to offering students resources that support the choice of life,” Hoffmann Harding said.Students can anonymously receive pregnancy tests through University Health Services or the local Women’s Care Center if they are uncomfortable with turning to an official school organization, Hoffmann Harding said. She also said that Notre Dame takes pains to include males in the pregnancy support process, especially since the fathers are often students themselves.The question of where students can find help is crucial, Hoffmann Harding said, and options range from the emotional and spiritual support of Saint Liam’s counseling services, campus ministry and hall staff to monetary assistance from the office of financial aid.“We must be empathetic, non-judgemental and good listeners,” Hoffmann Harding said. “We want to support the choice of life.”Hoffmann Harding showed a video produced by Notre Dame, which showcased the stories of former students who had unexpectedly become pregnant while they were undergraduates in school. The students spoke about the initial fear and uncertainty they experienced, but also talked about how they were able to successfully finish their educations and form families with the support of the university.There was an informal question and answer session after the talk finished and the discussion primarily focused on raising student awareness of the issue available help for unplanned pregnancies. Suggestions from the audience included placing informational posters on pregnancy support resources in the bathrooms of resident halls in similar manner to how Georgetown University advertises their own pregnancy assistance program.Hoffmann Harding said the University is continually looking for new ways to improve their support for pregnant students and she appreciates recommendations and ideas from students and faculty.Tags: Bread of Life Dinner, Erin Hoffmann Harding, Notre Dame, Notre Dame’s Center for Ethics and Culture, pregnancy, University Health Serviceslast_img read more

Students to share research at Human Development Conference

first_imgStudents from across the country and the world will present original research this Friday and Saturday at the seventh annual Human Development Conference.Senior and conference co-chair Christopher Newton said the conference’s basic goals are the same as any other academic conference: “dissemination of research, networking of researchers and sharing experiences and methods.”However, what makes this conference unique are the students presenting, Newton said. The conference will be composed of primarily undergraduates, both from all over the country and some from the nations of Uganda and India, he said.“These are undergrads, and a lot of them have conducted field work,” Newton said. “They’ve actually gone out to these countries and engaged with the people most closely involved [with these issues]. That’s a very difficult undertaking, so sharing how you go about that and what your experiences were is really valuable at this early stage of people’s development with that type of work.”Junior and conference co-chair Maggie Guzman said the diversity of participants at the conference will foster discussion throughout the weekend.“The purpose [of the Human Development Conference] is to create an environment of discussion, of debate, focusing on the future of development,” Guzman said. “This is a very interdisciplinary conference. We have students from all over the world and representing different majors. And they’re talking about different topics.”The inspiration behind the conference’s theme of “envision, enact, evaluate” was inspired by the expiration of the Millennium Development Goals in 2015 and the work to develop the Sustainable Development Goals to take their place, Newton said.“There’s the big picture [at the conference] of international development at large heading towards a crossroads,” he said.Jeffrey Sachs, who was highly involved in the creation of the Millennium Development Goals, will give the conference’s keynote address. The conference also boasts 16 different panels throughout the weekend, each of which addresses a different area of development, Newton said.“You could be going to a global health panel, and you could be getting national healthcare provision in Mexico and treatment of lymphatic filariasis in the Dominican Republic,” he said. “… That’s what we love personally about it — it’s just incredible the things that people are doing.”Even those who are not interested in doing research in development will benefit from listening to their peers at the conference, Guzman said.“It doesn’t just have to be only research, but if you’re interested in doing an internship, going abroad — getting a feel for the culture, the problems, the politics involved, the state of development in that region — that’s also very important,” she said. “We have very big focus and representation from all of the different areas around the world, so even if you have a slight interest in exploring the world, this is a great way to get exposed to the problems we are currently facing internationally.”Students are required to register for the conference if they plan to attend the event’s keynote address. Registration and more information on the conference is located on the Kellogg Institute’s website.Tags: Dominican Republic, Human Development Conference, Jeffrey Sachs, Mexicolast_img read more

Nine students receive USAID funding for development studies

first_imgThe University announced Monday that nine students have been selected to receive funding through the United States Agency for International Development to study global development challenges.The nine students who were selected include five doctoral students, Tracy-Lynn Cleary, Jenna Davidson, Catherine Flanley, Kristina Hook and Emily Maiden; two Master of Science students, Lilian Ramos and Megan Wright; and two undergraduate seniors, Lauran Feist and Samuel Lucas.“Today’s global development challenges need bold, innovative thinkers and solutions,” Notre Dame Initiative for Global Development (NDIGD) managing director, Michael Sweikar said in a statement. “NDIGD is thrilled to once again support some of the University’s most promising students in this opportunity to develop their research and create meaningful change.”According to the statement, the students will complete their research throughout 2017 and 2018.Tags: (USAID), Notre Dame Initiative for Global Developmentlast_img read more

Alumni, University pledge $50 million to support Corby Hall, Congregation of Holy Cross

first_imgAlumni donors, along with the University, have pledged $50 million to support Notre Dame and the Congregation of Holy Cross, the University announced in a press release Thursday.According to the press release, members of the class of 1979 Mary and Jay Flaherty — the benefactors of Flaherty Hall — will donate $20 million to Notre Dame for the renovations of Corby Hall, as well as “a separate $5 million gift to the Congregation [of Holy Cross] to benefit its aging religious.” The press release said Corby Hall’s name will remain unchanged.The University will supplement the Flahertys’ gift with an additional $10 million to refurbish Corby Hall and will donate $15 million to the Congregation as part of “a long tradition of supporting its founding order,” the press release said. Part of the donation will be put toward general needs, while $5 million will establish an endowment in the University’s Office of Mission Engagement and Church Affairs to “strengthen collaboration between the University and Congregation throughout the world.”Tags: Congregation of the Holy Cross, Corby Hall, donation, Flaherty familylast_img read more

Gateway Program provides path from Holy Cross to Notre Dame

first_imgPhoto Courtesy of Frankie Boley Gateway students pose for a photo outside Holy Cross College in 2016. Those with qualifying academics are admitted to Notre DameFormer gateway student junior Frankie Boley said she thought her freshman year was more relaxed because of her course load but also felt the pressure of making the grade in some courses.“It didn’t sound that hard coming from high school, but [general chemistry and calculus] made a B seem very tough at times,” Boley said. “I would find myself putting extra pressure on myself to get good grades, not just to do well on the exam or in the class, but to ensure I made it to Notre Dame.”Each semester of their freshman year, Gateway students take honors courses at Holy Cross as well as one course at Notre Dame. Holy Cross program directors help Gateway participants with enrollment, course selection and housing.Kranz said Holy Cross assistant director of admissions Adam DeBeck was someone Gateway students could count on to listen to their problems and concerns both serious and silly.“He was very relatable and sincerely cared for us, even if we were only there for a year,” Kranz said. “We still keep in contact today. We update each other on everything Bruce Springsteen.”Gateway students are encouraged to participate in clubs and other extracurricular activities at Notre Dame and Holy Cross. To encourage their integration between the schools, they receive Notre Dame IDs, meal swipes and email addresses.Kranz is in the process of transitioning into his new role as a senior football equipment manager, an activity he said he has been involved with since his time at Holy Cross.“Freshman year, when I was trying out to be a manager, I would drive to the early spring practices with my friend at six in the morning,” Kranz said. “Then we would go straight (from) there to our one class at Notre Dame.”The selective Gateway group grows close throughout their year at Holy Cross, Boley said, as some compete together in intramural athletics and others end up dating each other. Even after they transition schools, many, including Boley, say some of their closest college friends are from the program.“There were 56 students in our program in 2016, and I say, ‘Hi,’ to every single one of them when I see them,” she said.Those offered a spot in the program have until May 1, the national college decision day, to claim their spot. After that, a few students from the Notre Dame waitlist are offered a space in Gateway and have until June 15 to accept the offer. For some, the choice is easy, Kranz said.“If there was a way to go to Notre Dame, I was going to take that route, so I accepted right away,” he said. “It wasn’t a hard decision.”For former Gateway student junior Reilly Connor, however, the decision was a little more difficult, he said.“If I was accepted into Notre Dame, I would have committed the same day as it was my dream school,” Connor said. “This extra step certainly made me think much more on if it was something I was sure I wanted to do.”While many students in the Gateway Program reflect on the experience fondly, Connor said the experience can be tough at times.“I think that is something everyone has to decide for themselves,” he said. “It’s an unfortunate fact that Gateway is a year at a school you didn’t apply to and can feel like a hassle at times.”But for those who are set on attending Notre Dame, the program provides that chance, Connor said.“My family has always been huge Notre Dame football fans, and when I came to my first game, I fell in love with Notre Dame for more than the football team,” he said. “I committed myself to getting admitted which led me to Holy Cross and the Gateway Program.”The Gateway Program may not be the way students envisioned entering Notre Dame, but the program has been important to those who choose to partake, Boley said. She said she recommends Gateway to those who are given the opportunity.“If their goal is to go to the University of Notre Dame, then the Gateway Program will get them there,” she said. “They will take a different path than normal Notre Dame students, but there will be like 70 other people in the same boat. It gives you a family on your first day.”Tags: Admissions, Gateway, Gateway Program, Holy Cross College, Notre Dame admissions Each year, a select number of high school seniors who apply to Notre Dame are neither accepted, rejected nor added to the University’s wait list. Instead, they are offered the opportunity to participate in the Gateway Program.Former Gateway student, junior Harrison Kranz said he had never heard of the program until he was offered a place in it.“I was in the fourth class since its inception, but now I tell others that I used to be a Gateway and the response is usually, ‘Oh yeah, I know so-and-so is a Gateway,’” Kranz said. “It’s cool to see that awareness is spreading.”The Gateway Program was created in 2013 as a collaboration between Holy Cross College and Notre Dame. The program enrolls students at Holy Cross for their freshman year with the guarantee they will be admitted to Notre Dame at the start of their sophomore year so long as they maintain a GPA of 3.5 or higher and keep good standing with both institutions.last_img read more

Former Speaker of the House Paul Ryan to join Notre Dame faculty

first_imgPaul Ryan, former Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives, will join the Notre Dame faculty as a guest lecturer in economics and political science, the University announced in a press release Monday.Ryan, who recently finished two consecutive terms as Speaker of the House, has served as a Republican representative of Wisconsin’s first congressional district for the last 20 years. He will be joining former Indiana senator Joe Donnelly and former White House chief-of-staff Denis McDonough as “professors of the practice” at the University, the release said.“The study of political science is strengthened when students hear from people with real-world policy and political experience,” David Campbell, chair of the political science department at Notre Dame, said. “Having former officials in the classroom provides important insights for students — an opportunity to put the theories we study to the test.”Ryan will be lecturing on topics such as the basics of the United States government, current polarization in American politics and the intersection between Catholicism and economics, among other topics, the release said.Ryan has had family ties with Notre Dame for over 20 years, the release said.“[He] has his own connection to Notre Dame, where his brothers Stan and Tobin earned their bachelor’s degrees in economics,” the release said. “Ryan has visited Notre Dame many times over the years and now looks forward to getting directly involved with its students and faculty.”Ryan said he is looking forward to working and collaborating with Notre Dame students.“As an Irish Catholic from the Midwest, the University of Notre Dame has always held a special place in my heart,” Ryan said in the release. “It is an honor to be part of a University where Catholic principles, robust debates, academic freedoms and diverse viewpoints are allowed to flourish. As much as I hope to impart as a lecturer, I know that I will learn a tremendous amount from Notre Dame’s remarkable students as we discuss the big challenges before our nation and collaborate on how best to address them.”Ryan will assume his position as guest lecturer during the 2019-2020 academic year.Tags: denis mcdonough, Joe Donnelly, Paul Ryan, professor-of-the-practice, speaker of the houselast_img read more