Bread of Life Dinner discusses pregnant students

first_imgNotre Dame’s Center for Ethics and Culture hosted its semi-annual Bread of Life Dinner Tuesday evening in the Morris Inn. Senior Erin Stoyell-Mulholland who helped plan and run the event, said the dinner is an opportunity for undergraduate and graduate students to interact with faculty and have conversations about issues related to the protection and support of life in the context of a brief lecture. Tuesday’s lecture featured speaker was Erin Hoffmann Harding, vice president for student affairs, who spoke on the topic of “Promoting a Culture of Life at Notre Dame.”Hoffmann Harding said she wanted to start by dispelling the notion that Notre Dame imposes disciplinary action on pregnant students — a myth she said she has heard repeated by many people across campus from students to hall staff.“This issue is one of our biggest challenges and something I am particularly passionate about,” Hoffmann Harding said.Hoffmann Harding said Notre Dame offers a wide variety of tools to help with planned and unplanned pregnancies, in particular designated pregnancy support advocates, a pregnant and parenting student assistance fund and educational online resources.“As a Catholic university, Notre Dame is committed to life and to offering students resources that support the choice of life,” Hoffmann Harding said.Students can anonymously receive pregnancy tests through University Health Services or the local Women’s Care Center if they are uncomfortable with turning to an official school organization, Hoffmann Harding said. She also said that Notre Dame takes pains to include males in the pregnancy support process, especially since the fathers are often students themselves.The question of where students can find help is crucial, Hoffmann Harding said, and options range from the emotional and spiritual support of Saint Liam’s counseling services, campus ministry and hall staff to monetary assistance from the office of financial aid.“We must be empathetic, non-judgemental and good listeners,” Hoffmann Harding said. “We want to support the choice of life.”Hoffmann Harding showed a video produced by Notre Dame, which showcased the stories of former students who had unexpectedly become pregnant while they were undergraduates in school. The students spoke about the initial fear and uncertainty they experienced, but also talked about how they were able to successfully finish their educations and form families with the support of the university.There was an informal question and answer session after the talk finished and the discussion primarily focused on raising student awareness of the issue available help for unplanned pregnancies. Suggestions from the audience included placing informational posters on pregnancy support resources in the bathrooms of resident halls in similar manner to how Georgetown University advertises their own pregnancy assistance program.Hoffmann Harding said the University is continually looking for new ways to improve their support for pregnant students and she appreciates recommendations and ideas from students and faculty.Tags: Bread of Life Dinner, Erin Hoffmann Harding, Notre Dame, Notre Dame’s Center for Ethics and Culture, pregnancy, University Health Serviceslast_img read more

Kwakwani Secondary into NSBF Boys U-14 and Girls Developmental finals

first_imgKWAKWANI Secondary School surged into the finals of the Youth Basketball Guyana (YBG)- organised National School Basketball Festival Boys U-14 and Girls Developmental division when the semi-finals were played on Saturday evening at the Cliff Anderson Sports Hall.The Berbice River school, one of the most dominant in the 14-year Festival’s history, was able to surge ahead of the Bishops’ High School by a 45-27 margin in the Boys U-14 semis and by a 25-18 margin against Queen’s College in the Girls division.Meanwhile, Marian Academy girls team continued their flawless run in the Festival with a walkover win against Saint Stanislaus College. Saints boys were, however, able to get past President’s College (PC) 28-17 in the other U-14 semi-finals.STRONG FIRST HALFIn the Boys U-14 division, Kwakwani slowed down their Georgetown opponents with Gevon Ross pulling down 16 of his 21 rebounds and scoring seven of his nine points early. The dominance in the paint resulted in numerous second shot opportunities.Matthew David, who finished with 13 points, five rebounds and five steals, had scored eight points in the first period for an early 26-7 Kwakwani lead.Kellon Phillips and Travis Lewis finished with nine points each for the winners.The Georgetown school, who finished with a better second-half score (20-19), were led by Matthias Arindell who scored a game- high 17 points (10 of which were scored in the second half) and 11 rebounds.Saints were able to hold PC to only six points in the second period, which carried them to their 11-point win.David Bailey (also 14 rebounds) and Brandon Mckay scored 10 points each for the winners, while D. London scored nine points and eight rebounds for PC.In the female clash, Kwakwani were able to register a seven-point win, with Shania Sears leading the charge with nine points.Naiomi Barkoye finished with a game-high 11 points and 16 rebounds, but only Luanna Mohan (seven points, five rebounds and four steals) lent support.The finals of the Festival is scheduled for next Saturday at the same venue.last_img read more