Attack planting with a sound agronomic plan and timely decisions

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Matt HutchesonBy Matt Hutcheson, CCA, Product Manager, Seed Consultants, Inc.As spring weather warms up and conditions are conducive to field work, Ohio’s growers will have to deal with several challenges in the coming weeks. Prioritization and timely management will be key to success in the spring of 2019.The wet fall of 2018 resulted in an extended harvest and significant delays in field work. For many growers, harvest was not completed until December or later. As a result, very little fall tillage and/or fall herbicide applications were completed across the eastern Corn Belt. With a lack of tillage and herbicide applications, weeds, such as marestail, will be more prevalent in Ohio’s fields this spring. Making timely weed control actions this spring will be a critical part of achieving successful weed control this year. As always, follow herbicide labels, use correct rates, and apply under optimum conditions to effectively control weeds.With additional field work needed to be performed after a wet fall, time management will be an especially important consideration this spring. With the cool, wet weather pattern that has extended into early April, time will be of the essence. Growers should prioritize field operations and focus on what is most critical to producing crops. Minimizing and/or limiting trips across the field may be necessary to avoid significant planting delays. In some cases, growers may need to consider switching more acres to no-till/minimum till to reduce time spent on preparatory field operations.With the potential for delayed planting in 2019, it is important to revisit the discussion of planting date versus field conditions. For much of the Eastern Corn Belt it is widely understood that the optimal planting period is between April 20 and May 10. Research has proven that corn loses yield potential daily when planted after the beginning of May. For the Central Corn Belt, the declines in yield potential due to planting delays vary from about 0.3% per day early in May to about 1% per day by the end of May (Nielsen, 2013). Knowing that this is true, it can be frustrating during a wet spring or when field work is delayed for one reason or another. Planting is a critical component of a successful crop as it sets the stage for the entire growing season. However, it is important to keep in mind that early planting is just one of many factors that contribute to high yield potential. Planting early favors high yields, but it does not guarantee them and growers should not focus entirely on the calendar.Growers don’t have to look very far into the past for confirmation of this fact. According to data collected by the National Agricultural Statistics Service USDA/NASS, only 62% of the 2009 corn crop was planted by the week ending May 17. Despite later planting dates, the national average yield for the 2009 crop was 164.4 bushels per acre. In 2012, 96% of the corn crop was in the ground as of the week ending May 20. The crop was off to a great start, but thanks to the drought, the national average yield was only 123.1 bushels per acre in 2012. Although it is widely understood that planting date is an important management practice influencing corn yields, 2012 proved other factors (such as the drought) can diminish the yield potential of an early planted crop.When determining whether or not to head to the field, keep in mind soil conditions and the weather forecast. Field work performed in wet soil will create compaction that will impact yields for several years. “Mudding-in” seed early to beat a certain date on the calendar will almost always guarantee problems throughout the growing season. To avoid problems such as compaction, poor emergence, poor root development, and replant, growers should only plant early if field and weather conditions are conducive to adequate seed germination and plant growth. The first 24 to 48 hours a seed is in the ground is critical to its survival. Planting should only occur when soil is dry enough to avoid compaction and soil temperatures are 50 degrees F or higher for corn and 54 degrees of higher for soybeans. Avoid planting immediately before a cold rain or severe weather event. This will ensure that the best possible conditions for germination and stand establishment exist.Every spring comes with its own unique set of challenges. Sound agronomic plans and timely decision making with provide Ohio’s farmers with the best opportunities to produce high-yielding crops.last_img read more

Sony Digital Paper: A Step Forward in the Digital Transformation Process

first_imgMolekule Air Purifier: Small in Stature, Big on… Deanna RitchieManaging Editor at ReadWrite Canvia Digital Art Turns Home and Office Walls … Deanna is the Managing Editor at ReadWrite. Previously she worked as the Editor in Chief for Startup Grind and has over 20+ years of experience in content development. Blueair 680i Air Purifier: Clean Air For Your H… Where to BuyYou can buy Sony’s Digital Paper at retailers, including Amazon, WalMart, and Best Buy.Overall ImpressionsOn the positive side, Sony’s Digital Paper looks cool and offers beneficial functionality and benefit. It also gives us a glimpse of the digital future and how we can bring others who prefer paper into the digital environment. I like the clear resolution and full-page viewing as well as the sleek design. It comes in under a quarter of an inch thick and makes it easy to carry with me wherever I go.This technology needs the backlight; hopefully, that will be in an updated version.  With the high price tag of around $700 for what essentially is a read-write PDF tablet, this is a “nice to have” but not a “need to have” gadget. However, sometimes watching their website can get you in on their sales — I recommend this. Other model prices are — CP1 $499 and RP1 $599. Related Posts HyperDrive Power 9-in-1 USB-C Hub The idea of paper being digital may sound like a bit of an oxymoron, but not to Sony. They’ve introduced a digital paper solution. As a tech lover and advocate of the digital transformation of businesses away from paper processes, I had to try it out.What is Digital Paper?The digital paper takes the ease of reading and writing on real paper and combines it with the efficiency and convenience of digital features. These features include easy sharing across devices (PC, Mac, or mobile device) via an app, searchable document capability, and secure document encryption. It has a paper-like texture but offers the precision capability of a screen as well as easily stores for reference and review at a later date. Plus, you can highlight, write, or erase just as you would do with regular paper.Sony offers two main sizes of digital paper. The 13” letter size works best for when you want to read, annotate, or take notes on full-size pages while the more compact, lightweight 10” notebook size is more convenient for portability.Digital Paper FeaturesWith a WI-FI or Bluetooth connection as well as the desktop or mobile Digital Paper App, you can sync documents with a computer or mobile phone, so it’s easy to share these documents with other devices and cloud services. You get a certain amount of local storage, which allows you to store thousands of files. It has a 2.0 GHz CPU and 16GB of internal memory (11GB free out of the box), which means it can hold approximately 10,000 PDF files.Even though you want to share with certain people, you also want to protect that digital paper, so it uses password encryption technology as well as AES 128 data encryption.Other features include the ability to view two pages at once plus you can zoom into the text by circling the area. You can also copy and paste text throughout the document by using the same tool.It has a long battery life. The digital paper can go one week on a single charge or up to three weeks if you aren’t using Wi-Fi. When you plug in the Digital Paper tool, an LED light on top will show you when it’s charging.Some Issues to NoteDespite the many benefits this device offers, there were some missing features. First, I can’t search any of my handwritten notes to find something I need. It only lets me search for phrases or words that are part of the original document text.Second, the stylus could be better. The stylus does look nice and is lightweight, but the button on the side that I need to press to erase or highlight with doesn’t work well. I find myself erasing or highlighting more than I intended, which creates more work. I had to slow down to make sure no mistakes were made, which felt unproductive.Third, while the software is easy to use, it could do more. To sync files to my desktop, I had first to install Sony’s Digital Paper app on my computer. Then, I have to use a USB cable, Wi-Fi, or Bluetooth to upload the files. Once I connected to a known W-iFi network, fortunately, it continued to recognize it, so I didn’t have to plug it into my computer each time I wanted to do a sync or file transfer. However, if you need to switch locations continually, it’s a lot more work to sync or do a file transfer.Fourth, I can share documents to third-party cloud services like Dropbox and Google Docs, it’s not integrated into the actual device, so I can’t send them directly. Thankfully, there is now a mobile app; this process makes the product seamless and so much easier.last_img read more

Jeep Renegade coming to India at 2018 Auto Expo

first_imgAmerican carmaker Jeep has just revealed their India-spec Compass. It will be launched in India in the third quarter of 2017 but the big news we have stumbled upon is the Renegade coming to India. According to reports, the Renegade is headed to India and will most probably be revealed at the 2018 Auto Expo.The Renegade is the smallest offering from Jeep and is offered in both, 4×2 and 4×4 setups in the international market. It is sold in four trims – Sport, Latitude, Altitude and Trailhawk. While the first three trims are powered by a 1.4-litre MultiAir turbocharged petrol engine which is capable of churning out 160PS and 250Nm torque, the Trailhawk which is the most capable trim of the Renegade has a 2.4-litre naturally aspirated MultiAir petrol engine that makes 180PS and 237Nm torque.Also Read:Jeep Compass revealed in India: See full specs and pictures hereAs of now, Jeep has not revealed anything officially and thus it cannot be confirmed what avatar the Renegade will come to India in, however it will be slotted underneath the Compass and could become the second Jeep car to be built in India.The Renegade will be an ideal vehicle for Indian conditions, small and nimble, but powerful enough to go anywhere.Also Read:Jeep reveals India spec Compass SUV in online videolast_img read more

a month agoMan City boss Guardiola: I’d be Fraudiola without my players!

first_imgAbout the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your say Man City boss Guardiola: I’d be Fraudiola without my players!by Freddie Taylora month agoSend to a friendShare the loveManchester City manager Pep Guardiola says he’d be nothing without his players.Guardiola was speaking in defence of his squad after Saturday’s shock loss to Norwich City.”They gave me all the prestige I have in England, when the first season when it was Fraud Guardiola, Fraudiola,” he said.”This kind of game here in England – it’s not possible to play because you need to have tackles and you have to play like that – these players gave me the prestige that I have.”And now all around the world people say how good a manager I am – it’s for them, not for me.” last_img read more

Football The final drive that lifted Ohio State over Michigan and Curtis

OSU junior H-back Curtis Samuel (4) scores the game-winning touchdown in the second overtime of the Buckeyes’ 30-27 win over Michigan on Nov. 26. Credit: Alexa Mavrogianis | Photo EditorThe No. 2 Ohio State Buckeyes took down the No. 3 Michigan Wolverines on Saturday in an unprecedented finish that is often only present in dreams.Junior H-back Curtis Samuel took a handoff and ran to the left sideline where redshirt freshman running back Mike Weber and redshirt senior center Pat Elflein paved the way for the game-winning touchdown in OSU’s 30-27 double-overtime victory. In Weber’s first game in the rivalry and Elflein’s fifth, the two created one of the most memorable plays in the history of the rivalry.“It’s ‘29 lead’ is the call, and Curtis scored,” OSU coach Urban Meyer said.After that moment, Meyer coiled over and was on the ground. He was helped up by members of the staff and, well, he really doesn’t know who.“I don’t know,” he said. “Curtis scored going to the left.”When asked what happened immediately after the game, it was like Meyer was stuck in a loop where he could only remember the play that saved his season.“Yeah, Curtis scored,” he said.For years to come, Meyer won’t be the only one to remember that play. All 110,045 people in attendance — an Ohio Stadium record — will remember that play, either in reminiscing or in self-pity. Samuel became a player cemented in college football history as well as the ongoing tradition of the Scarlet and Gray against the Maize and Blue on the last week in November.But it almost didn’t happen.OSU salvaged a disastrous offensive day by riding its two biggest playmakers in overtime. OSU began the first overtime with the ball and it took just an 18-yard gain from Samuel on the first play and a 7-yard gain from redshirt junior quarterback J.T. Barrett on the next to put OSU in front for the first time since the second quarter.When OSU got the ball in the second overtime, the Buckeyes were trailing by a field goal. Again, only Barrett and Samuel would touch the ball.Barrett was sacked for 4 yards on 2nd-and-5 from the Michigan 20, OSU had a critical 3rd-and-9 in front of them. OSU kicker Tyler Durbin had missed two field goals already in the game, so confidence certainly wasn’t at an all-time high for the kicking game.Barrett threw a swing pass to Samuel, who was trapped in the backfield and was going to be tackled for a loss. A couple dozen moves later, Samuel zigged and zagged from the right side of the field to the left for an 8-yard gain to set up a 4th-and-1 from the Michigan 16.“I couldn’t even tell you how it happened,” Samuel said. “I got to go back and look at that one. I knew I had to make a play for my team and that just happened.”Samuel put the Buckeyes well inside the range of Durbin, but Meyer had confidence in his offense even when down by three with the game on the line. Now, Meyer is known for his gutsy play calling, but the decision to go for it on 4th-and-1 when all OSU needed was a field goal was worthy of a concussion protocol to make sure Meyer was mentally in check to make the call. For him, it came down to an old adage.“If you can’t get that far, you’re not a championship team,” Meyer said.Barrett barely reached the line to gain and the call stood after a replay review that Meyer said made his heart stop. Without Samuel running rampant across the field, the chance for a win would’ve never happened. On the next play, Samuel finished his improbable overtime with the game-winning score and Columbus was sent into a frenzy.Dubbed as the team’s No. 1 playmaker from the beginning of the season, Samuel didn’t put up astronomical stats, but showed up when the game mattered.“In crunch time and you need someone to make a play and your number is called and you make it, that’s a playmaker,” Elflein said. “It doesn’t matter if it’s throwing, blocking or running the ball, when it’s crunch time and you need someone to step up, that’s a playmaker.”As soon as Samuel broke the goal line, Elflein and redshirt junior guard Billy Price were the first to hug him and were soon joined by the team.“First off I got to say, I want to thank God. I gotta thank God,” Samuel said. “My team, we fought. It was a hard game … Without them, that wouldn’t have happened.”Well, it did happen, and neither Samuel nor anyone else will soon forget the first overtime game in the history of the rivalry. read more

Meyers Real Life Wednesdays look to prepare Ohio State football players for

Lantern file photoOne of Urban Meyer’s primary tasks as Ohio State football coach is to get his football players focused and prepared to win games, and potentially a national championship, during the 2013 college football season.All of those players, however, will eventually move on from being student-athletes at OSU. While some of those players may continue in OSU’s long line of sending players to the National Football League, most will have to quickly adjust to life after football.Recognizing this, Meyer instituted a program for his players called “Real Life Wednesdays,” something he brought to OSU after instituting it prior to his final season at the University of Florida, according to OSU athletic spokesman Jerry Emig. During spring semester, speakers were brought in to talk to the team each week about a variety of issues that players will have to deal with in their lives after college football.Many of the speakers brought in for the program were people who once sat in the same seats as the audience they were speaking to. Numerous former OSU football players were invited back to speak to the team, including Dee Miller (1994-98), Ryan Miller (1993-96) and Chris Spielman (1984-87).Dee Miller and Ryan Miller both had to transition quickly away from their NFL dreams. Dee Miller was a sixth-round selection by the Green Bay Packers in the 1999 NFL draft, but never played in an NFL game. Ryan Miller was invited to training camp by the New York Jets after not being drafted, but he did not make the team’s roster.Dee Miller, who works as a State Farm agent in Hilliard, Ohio, said he was “ecstatic” when Meyer called him and asked him to speak to the team.“When reality hits you, when the football career is over with, it’s what have you done to prepare for life after football,” Dee Miller said in an interview with The Lantern. “I came back and was able to show guys, you know what, you can still have a pretty good life if you don’t make it in the NFL. I think that was important for them to see that, and they can relate to former players because I was them.”Ryan Miller said he wanted to be a part of the program because of the valuable lessons he learned from former OSU football players, specifically Jim Lachey, during his own years with the Buckeyes.“I can remember being in that same situation … and I thought it was unbelievably helpful and valuable,” Ryan Miller told The Lantern. “When (Meyer) asked me and talked to me about ‘Real Life Wednesdays,’ I just thought it was such a great idea that I wanted to be a part of it, and hopefully be a part of this for years to come.”Dee Miller said he told the players that while their status as OSU football players will help them find career opportunities, they cannot rely on that status for post-football success.“Ohio State will get you to the door, will get you to the interview, but once you get in the interview, it’s basically, how can you impact my company?” Dee Miller said. “I think it helps, but I think you also have to be prepared in what you think you’re about to get into so that Ohio State is able to help you.”Ryan Miller, who is a founding partner of M2Marketing and co-founder of the 2nd & Seven foundation (along with OSU assistant coaches Luke Fickell and Mike Vrabel), said he thinks OSU football players have an “advantage” other college students may not have because of resources like “Real Life Wednesdays.”“They would have seen a lot of different things that they may had to have waited until they graduate to hear, so I think it’s an advantage without a doubt,” Ryan Miller said. “Having the opportunity is one thing. It’s what you do with that opportunity that really makes all the difference in the world. My hope is that it could for a majority of the kids, and they take some of these ‘Real Life Wednesdays’ to heart.”Spielman, an ESPN broadcaster who was a two-time All-American at OSU, was able to continue his NFL career for 10 seasons. He said he focused on family and responsibility when he spoke to the team.“I was trying to use my life experience to try to just show them the importance of taking responsibility,” Spielman said in an interview with The Lantern. “Football can teach you about being part of a team and being responsible to your team, but obviously a family is a much stronger, bigger team than a football team will ever be, especially if you’re a husband and a father.”Spielman’s wife, Stefanie Spielman, passed away in 2009 following a battle with breast cancer. Chris Spielman is a father to four children.Former OSU football players were not the only speakers the Buckeyes had access to this spring. Harley-Davidson CEO Keith Wandell, Limited Brands chairman/CEO and former OSU Board of Trustees president Les Wexner and Clark Kellogg, a former OSU basketball player who is currently the Indiana Pacers’ vice president of player relations and a college basketball broadcaster for CBS, were among the other professionals who spoke to the team.Harry Trombitas, a retired FBI special agent who is now a lecturer for OSU’s sociology department, was another speaker in the program. He said that like other students who are uncertain about their career paths, he encouraged the football team to “keep an open mind” if they are trying to figure out what career to pursue after football.“They’re moving into the world of adulthood where they really have to start preparing for the rest of their lives,” Trombitas said. “It’s OK to have fun and do things in college like a regular college student would, but you really have to be careful of the choices that you make, and understand you’re setting the stage for what you’re going to do the rest of your life.”Chris Spielman said there were not many programs specifically in place to teach life lessons during his time as an OSU football player.“Life lessons were conveyed through my watching of my parents and watching people around me,” Chris Spielman said.Dee Miller said that while OSU provided resources that student-athletes could take advantage of to prepare for life after football, there was not as much structure to providing those resources when he played for the Buckeyes.“Back then, the focus on academics and life after football was not like it is today,” Dee Miller said.Meyer and the OSU football program also brought a new opportunity to the players this year. Senior staff and human resource representatives from 57 businesses and organizations came to Ohio Stadium on Thursday for a student-athlete job fair, which was organized by the OSU football program.The entire OSU football team and “as many as 50 to 75” student-athletes from other OSU sports teams attended the job fair, Emig said.Nike, ESPN and IMG were among the organizations present, while NFL senior vice president of player engagement Troy Vincent and Ohio Gov. John Kasich were also available at the job fair, according to a press release. Kasich also spoke to the football team prior to the job fair.Ryan Stamper, Ohio State football’s coordinator of player development, said in a press release that every player on the team “had to have a new resume” for the job fair.“Every player learned about resumes and key components of them, and then our staff, support services staff and academic advisors helped each one update their existing resume or create a new one,” Stamper said. “And every one of our players, including freshmen, had to have a list going into the job fair of four business areas or interests that they would like to speak with reps about and learn about.”Redshirt senior left tackle Jack Mewhort said in the press release that the Buckeyes spent months preparing for the job fair.“The speakers we’ve heard and the people we’ve spoken to (at the job fair) have given us real insight into the opportunities and careers we can strive for,” Mewhort said. read more

Wrestling Five Buckeyes move on in NCAA championships three others compete in

Ohio State redshirt junior wrestler Bo Jordan moved on in the championships bracket at the NCAA championships. Credit: Courtesy of OSU AthleticsST. LOUIS — After the first day of the NCAA Division I Wrestling Championships, Ohio State sits in second place with 26 points, trailing only Penn State at 30.5. Five Buckeyes remain alive in the championship bracket, while three others will look to contribute from the consolation bracket.The Buckeyes are looking to capture their second NCAA title in three years after winning it all at the 2015 tournament.Seven Buckeyes secured wins in the first round, and six of those came with bonus points, headlined by junior heavyweight Kyle Snyder’s 12-takedown technical fall.OSU was also aided by major decisions from redshirt junior Nathan Tomasello at 133 pounds, redshirt sophomore Micah Jordan at 149 pounds, redshirt junior Bo Jordan at 174 pounds, sophomore Myles Martin at 184 pounds and redshirt freshman Kollin Moore at 197 pounds in the first round.Freshman 141-pounder Luke Pletcher also won in the first round — 8-5 over Michigan’s Sal Profaci — but was taken down by Rutgers’ Anthony Ashnault in the second round.Martin got close to a technical fall in the first leg with his 23-10 win over Bucknell’s Garrett Hoffman, but suffered a loss to Illinois’ Emery Parker in the second round. Martin won a national championship at 174 pounds in 2016, but will not have the chance to repeat after the loss.The other five Buckeyes – Tomasello, Micah Jordan, Bo Jordan, Moore and Snyder – won their second round matchup and advanced to the quarterfinals, which will take place Friday morning.Oklahoma State, who sent 10 wrestlers to the tourney, advanced nine of those wrestlers, and Penn State advanced eight. OSU is sandwiched between those two schools on the leaderboard after Day 1.Three Buckeyes have previously won a national championship — Tomasello won in 2015 and placed third in 2016, Snyder won in 2016 and Martin won as a true freshman in 2016.After winning the Big Ten tournament on March 5, and with impressive wrestling throughout the roster, the Buckeyes are aiming to move up the leaderboards.Redshirt freshman Jose Rodriguez won his first consolation bracket matchup with a fall in the first period at 125 pounds. Redshirt sophomore and 165-pounder Cody Burcher lost his first matchup in both the championship and consolation brackets, and was eliminated from competition.Friday Morning Schedule:Championship BracketNo. 1 Nathan Tomasello (OSU) vs. No. 8 Zane Richards (ILL)No. 4 Micah Jordan (OSU) vs. No. 5 Brandon Sorensen (Iowa)No. 3 Bo Jordan (OSU) vs. No. 11 Alex Meyer (Iowa)No. 3 Kollin Moore (OSU) vs. No. 6 Preston Weigel (OKST)No. 1 Kyle Snyder (OSU) vs. No. 8 Michael Kroells (MINN)Consolation BracketJose Rodriguez vs. No. 5 Tim Lambert (NEB)No. 12 Luke Pletcher vs. Christopher Carton (Iowa) read more