Irish economist spurs Irish patriotism

first_imgAccording to Irish economist and author David McWilliams, one solution to Ireland’s recent economic problems may come from the Irish but not from Ireland, it would come from what he calls the “great Irish tribe.” McWilliams gave a lecture titled, “Ireland, Europe and the Irish Diaspora – Re-imagining Ireland in the 21st Century,” in the Rare Book Room of the Hesburgh Library on Friday. McWilliams said Ireland’s current economic turmoil amidst the general problems of the Eurozone requires something drastic, but he believes this solution could be provided by the people worldwide who identify themselves as Irish. “The future of Ireland needs another shock, and that’s where you come in, where the diaspora comes in,” McWilliams said. He said the possibility of enlisting the self-identified Irish in places like the United States, Canada and Australia first came to his mind due to the comment of a mentor. McWilliams said he was assigned a very experienced Israeli mentor while working for a Swiss bank in Israel. One day, this mentor said he noticed that he dealt with many ethnically Irish people when working with American companies and asked McWilliams whether or not the Irish had any mechanism for bringing these people back to Ireland. McWilliams said he hadn’t given the subject much thought before then, but he didn’t think there was any such effort. “We’ve done nothing but repel the tribe as far as I can tell,” he said. McWilliams said he has since begun working on various projects to make use of the Irish overseas and his reason for coming to Notre Dame was to propose his ideas. “[Notre Dame] is an incredibly powerful place to start these projects. Notre Dame is a huge resource for the Irish in America and a brilliant center for Irish connections. You can use Notre Dame to champion some of the ideas and feed into its network of alumni,” he said. “This could be a huge project which Notre Dame could be involved in.” McWilliams said there are three elements of his overall proposal, a program resembling the “Birthright Israel” program, allowing Irish ex-patriots to vote in national elections and reaching out to the ethnically Irish based on town records. McWilliams said during his time in Israel he learned about the birthright program, which provides free 10-day educational trips to Israel for Jewish young adults from 60 different countries. McWilliams said he is hoping to create a similar program for Irish young adults. The goal of the program is to instill a strong emotional connection with Ireland and their Irish heritage in the young adults, McWilliams said.”Emotional things that happen to you as a kid stick with you. Imagine as an American what it would mean to visit Ireland when you’re 15,” McWilliams said. McWilliams said he has seen Polish, Italian, American and other ex-patriot groups line-up to vote in their nation’s elections while living overseas. Similarly enfranchising Irish citizens who are living abroad could help to alleviate problems of provisionalism and clientalism present in current Irish politics, he said. McWilliams said those who have lived abroad for a while might have a better perspective on what is good for the Irish nation as a whole. McWilliams said he is also leading an effort to use town records and town gossips to trace the emigration stories of the world’s ethnically Irish and then reaching out to them with their own history. “We can email you, everyone’s contactable nowadays, with a Google Maps image of the specific field from which your relative emigrated from Ireland,” he said. “With tech we can bring all this together.” McWilliams said this idea that Ireland ought to do more to engage the ethnically Irish of the world, his “diaspora strategy,” was not initially as well received as it is now. He said the idea progressed through the three stages of reception from “open ridicule” to “violent opposition” to “everyone claims they were already on your side.” “The idea was fist considered risible, something to be laughed at, but now everyone has a diaspora strategy,” he said. McWilliams said this effort could be very successful because Ireland has one of the best “brand” names in the world, but it all depends on the cooperation of the Irish diaspora. “The power of the diaspora can be forged to improve the ‘product’ of Ireland, a country with the most powerful ‘brand’ in the world because every member of the diaspora is a salesperson for the ‘brand,’” he said. “We can only do this if we work together.”last_img read more

Running with my little bro

first_imgI’ve been a “Big Brother” with Big Brothers Big Sisters of WNC for over a year now and the experience has been a rewarding one for both myself and my little brother Jordan. Probably a big reason why we were matched together was because of our fondness of sports. To date we have participated in many activities involving some form of exercise, culminating with this past weekend’s 3rd Annual Run for Kid’s Sake 5k on the beautiful Warren Wilson Campus.I signed us both up for this race as the proceeds directly benefit BBBS of WNC. Running together for a great cause and a chance to work up some sweat on a summer morning was too tempting to pass up. Jordan seemed excited about the race prior but race morning he was quieter than normal and probably a little nervous for his first ever 5k. Race morning provided us with nice weather and a great turnout of well over 100 other runners. I also saw several other “bigs” getting ready to run with their “littles”.Jordan and I started off at a nice and controlled pace for the first mile, a perfect way to start a 5k race. Jordan seemed happy, determined and focused. After passing the first mile marker on the Warren Wilson Farm gravel road, we approached an aid station and the trail section of the course along the Swannanoa River. As I looked ahead I saw runners swatting at their legs and backside, immediately I knew what was happening or what was going to happen….bees.As we got to this section I looked over at Jordan and yelled to run this next 50 feet very fast. I didn’t explain why as I knew that could cause a log jam of runners right over the bee’s nest. Well we both got stung in the ankle. However Jordan apparently had never been stung by a bee before as I found out shortly after when asking if he was allergic. He was a real trooper and fought through the initial pain and soon started running once again. Unfortunately I got stuck behind some other runners in a single file line on the narrow trail. Eventually I was able to get around everyone and catch back up to my swift moving friend just before mile 2 on the course.I mentioned to Jordan as we ran together that the last mile was the toughest mile so he would be prepared. We made our way up the last hilly section and I could tell he was getting pretty tired. As I’ve done many times to myself inwardly at races, I told Jordan that we need to really finish strong. He gave me a funny look as if to say “what is wrong with this man?” Anyways he did pick up the pace and had a strong finishing kick. As we rounded the corner to the finish line, Jordan was greeted by several cheering family members who came out to watch him race. He finished 85th overall and he was 2nd in his age group with a great time of 37:29. Not bad at all for his first 5k! It was great to see all the smiles after the finish, especially all the “littles” who probably had just completed their first 5k. 1 2last_img read more

Kwakwani Secondary into NSBF Boys U-14 and Girls Developmental finals

first_imgKWAKWANI Secondary School surged into the finals of the Youth Basketball Guyana (YBG)- organised National School Basketball Festival Boys U-14 and Girls Developmental division when the semi-finals were played on Saturday evening at the Cliff Anderson Sports Hall.The Berbice River school, one of the most dominant in the 14-year Festival’s history, was able to surge ahead of the Bishops’ High School by a 45-27 margin in the Boys U-14 semis and by a 25-18 margin against Queen’s College in the Girls division.Meanwhile, Marian Academy girls team continued their flawless run in the Festival with a walkover win against Saint Stanislaus College. Saints boys were, however, able to get past President’s College (PC) 28-17 in the other U-14 semi-finals.STRONG FIRST HALFIn the Boys U-14 division, Kwakwani slowed down their Georgetown opponents with Gevon Ross pulling down 16 of his 21 rebounds and scoring seven of his nine points early. The dominance in the paint resulted in numerous second shot opportunities.Matthew David, who finished with 13 points, five rebounds and five steals, had scored eight points in the first period for an early 26-7 Kwakwani lead.Kellon Phillips and Travis Lewis finished with nine points each for the winners.The Georgetown school, who finished with a better second-half score (20-19), were led by Matthias Arindell who scored a game- high 17 points (10 of which were scored in the second half) and 11 rebounds.Saints were able to hold PC to only six points in the second period, which carried them to their 11-point win.David Bailey (also 14 rebounds) and Brandon Mckay scored 10 points each for the winners, while D. London scored nine points and eight rebounds for PC.In the female clash, Kwakwani were able to register a seven-point win, with Shania Sears leading the charge with nine points.Naiomi Barkoye finished with a game-high 11 points and 16 rebounds, but only Luanna Mohan (seven points, five rebounds and four steals) lent support.The finals of the Festival is scheduled for next Saturday at the same venue.last_img read more

Wellington Police Notes: Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2013

first_imgWellington Police notes for Wednesday, October 23, 2013•3:21 a.m.  Officers investigated suspicious activity in the 600 block of N. Plum.•7:37 a.m. Nicholas J. Layton, 21, Wellington was arrested, confined and bonded for being charged with speeding 45 mph in a posted 25 mph work zone and driving while drivers license suspended.•10:28 a.m. Officers investigated a theft of a cell phone in the 300 block of E. Lincoln.•10:50 a.m. Catherine  M. King, 25, Wellington was issued a  notice to appear charged with dog at large and no collar/tags on dog.•3:14 p.m. Tanya R. Chancellor, 40, Wellington was issued an nta for Speeding 33 mph in a 20 mph school zone and expired registration.•5:44 p.m., Officers investigated a non-injury accident ,in the 500 block of E 16th, involving a vehicle operated by a juvenile female, 16, Wellington and a parked and unoccupied vehicle owned by Amy R. McClure, Wellington.•7:05 p.m., Officers investigated suspicious activity in the 900 block of N. Woodlawn.•8:35 p.m. Brandon J. Huerta, 22, Wellington was issued a notice to appear charged with no tail lights.last_img read more