Alumni, University pledge $50 million to support Corby Hall, Congregation of Holy Cross

first_imgAlumni donors, along with the University, have pledged $50 million to support Notre Dame and the Congregation of Holy Cross, the University announced in a press release Thursday.According to the press release, members of the class of 1979 Mary and Jay Flaherty — the benefactors of Flaherty Hall — will donate $20 million to Notre Dame for the renovations of Corby Hall, as well as “a separate $5 million gift to the Congregation [of Holy Cross] to benefit its aging religious.” The press release said Corby Hall’s name will remain unchanged.The University will supplement the Flahertys’ gift with an additional $10 million to refurbish Corby Hall and will donate $15 million to the Congregation as part of “a long tradition of supporting its founding order,” the press release said. Part of the donation will be put toward general needs, while $5 million will establish an endowment in the University’s Office of Mission Engagement and Church Affairs to “strengthen collaboration between the University and Congregation throughout the world.”Tags: Congregation of the Holy Cross, Corby Hall, donation, Flaherty familylast_img read more

E-skimming: The new never-ending war on online fraud

first_img continue reading » Names like Ticketmaster, Best Buy, Delta Airlines and the Atlanta Hawks might conjure images of fun and entertainment, but they all have something more unfortunate in common – all have been victims of digital fraud.Like physical skimmers that criminals hide in compromised POS machines, gas pumps, and ATMs, digital card skimmers have been successful at stealing plastic card data from unwitting customers via the websites of the above-mentioned businesses. But they are not alone. “E-skimmers,” as they are commonly known, have continuously ramped up in frequency, sophistication, and impact over the past several years, resulting in millions of dollars in losses from many well-known businesses and organizations.How Does E-skimming Occur?E-skimming occurs when hackers install a malware code in the checkout section of a merchant’s website. At a more granular level, they inject “scripts” into e-commerce websites that record the card data entered in payment forms. While the cardholder is completing their order and submitting their payment information, the malware siphons the data such as credit/debit card number, expiration date, CVV2/CVC2, name and address to a separate server. Hackers are also focusing on third-party vendors, as well as chat boxes used by online merchants to further commit e-skimming crimes. But it doesn’t stop there. To add to the ever-growing channels to commit fraud schemes, mobile devices are being used for fraud more than ever, while consumers are becoming more susceptible to social engineering attacks they receive. The reason? Everyday tasks can serve as a distraction; they essentially hinder consumers’ abilities to pay careful attention to any personal information that is being requested. 28SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more