Candidates debate domestic policy

first_imgPresident Barack Obama and Gov. Mitt Romney debated domestic policy Wednesday evening in the first of three presidential debates during an evening that seemed to focus more on style than substance at the University of Denver. In a reversal of the usual pattern, Romney’s poised, polished performance seemed to outshine Obama’s lackluster appearance, political science professor Michael Zuckert said. “Romney knew exactly how he wanted to put things and he put them pithily, he put them smartly and sharply ⎯ he was very smooth,” Zuckert said. “Obama was still looking for words and ways to formulate things … He should have had better formulations right at hand that he could have relied on and spoken more forcefully, instead of groping around for ways to express things that he could have had on the tip of his tongue.” This impressive showing from Romney won him the debate, at least stylistically, Zuckert said. “In terms of overall impression, Romney carried a lot of the debate, but in terms of issues, I think Obama carried it,” Zuckert said. “I saw the polls afterward and they said that they thought Romney could handle the economy better, that Romney could handle jobs better.” The thermometer measuring audience reaction on the bottom of the CNN broadcast of the debate seemed to indicate that the audience was reacting more to style than substance, Zuckert said. “It isn’t clear to me how much of the content of what they actually said made an impression, but I do think that style counts a lot,” Zuckert said. “That’s an example of why rhetoric is important – people react more to the impressions things leave on them rather than the substance of what is there … and the impression in this performance was that Romney is ‘presidential.’” Film, Television and Theatre professor Susan Ohmer said Romney’s structured answers helped him retain attention. “It was striking to me that he numbered his points,” Ohmer said. “That’s a strategy that you see in formal debate that helps keep listeners organized – a very smart strategy on [former] Governor Romney’s part.” Moderator Jim Lehrer, executive editor and former news anchor of PBS news hour, told the candidates that the debate would be divided into six units of 15 minutes, each structured around different focal points. The first question asked the candidates to speak to their plans to create jobs, which focused the debate on differences between two disparate plans to stimulate the economy. Economics professor Eric Sims said this beginning gave Romney a lot of momentum starting the debate. “I think people vote with their pocketbooks,” Sims said. “People want to ask the question ‘Are you better off now than you were four years ago?’ and I don’t think many people can say yes to that question – the president is taking a hit for that.” Rarely has an incumbent candidate been reelected to the presidency after presiding over a downturn in the economy, Sims said. “Historically speaking it is surprising that a president would be running this well with the economy in this shape,” Sims said. “To be fair it is hard to tell how responsible President Obama is or is not for that… he did walk into a bad situation but it is very unusual that we are in a recession and he is polling so well.” Both candidates have very different visions on how to solve the jobs problem, but Romney’s points were more salient because he was able to put Obama on the defensive, Sims said. The president failed to refocus the discussion of the economic progress and job creation during his term as an analysis on improvement, rather than focusing on its current status, Zuckert said. “Bill Clinton gave Obama a script that he could have used more effectively on that issue, and though Obama did try, he didn’t push it as forcefully as he might have done as a ‘Look where we started from and look where we are type of thing’ as opposed to ‘Look where we are at the absolute moment,’” Zuckert said. “Obama didn’t emphasize the trends, some of the trends are not great but they’re better than Romney portrayed them.” Zuckert said the focus on the economy played right into Romney’s hands. “Criticism of Obama on unemployment is still Romney’s best technique, but I’ve been waiting to hear more details about how he would actually change [unemployment],” Zuckert said. “I just haven’t heard a policy to me that sounds persuasive enough yet, to me it’s just not enough detail.” Romney was able to contrast his experience with business and economic policy with the relative lack of progress made in those areas in the past four years, Sims said. “That’s Obama’s weakest point. Barack Obama has a lot of pluses: he’s very likeable, at least four years ago he brought this attitude of hope and change to Washington, but the reality is that the economy stinks,” Sims said. “I think this was playing to Romney’s wheelhouse, domestic and economic policy: That’s where he has experience… In their discussion Romney came across as having a very good grasp of economics, in contrast I thought the President looked a little timid at times.” One of the strongest points Romney made was a criticism of the timing of Obama’s health care law, Sims said. “Romney’s point was that he was surprised that Obama was going to move this healthcare reform through [Congress] so fast right in the middle of an economic downturn, and that though we do need that kind of legislation – some kind of healthcare reform in the long term – when the real issue should have been jobs, President Obama was pushing through healthcare reform that created a lot of uncertainty,” Sims said. “Uncertainty is not conducive to a healthy labor market on both ends.” Ohmer said the differences in policy between Romney and Republican vice presidential nominee Paul Ryan were highlighted during the debate and by the work of fact checkers after the debate. “Ryan has endorsed legislation that will [end] Pell Grants, while Romney has said he wouldn’t do that,” Ohmer said. “Romney has also said that he won’t cut five trillion dollars when fact checkers said he would.” The degree to which each candidate moved toward the middle was striking, Zuckert said. “Even though people have said the issues were really strongly defined, they moved back towards each other,” Zuckert said. “Romney did maybe more than Obama, but both did substantially: Obama did in his litany about small businesses and job creation, and Romney in how he tailored his position from what we have heard before.” The fundamental difference between the candidates is the role that each envisions for the government within the economy, Sims said. “They characterize each other as free market capitalism and socialism, but on the broad level it is really that one side wants less government intervention and more power and choice in the hands of the individual, while the other side wants more government involvement – I think at the end of the day that’s the main difference here,” Sims said. The debate has changed America’s perception of the choice to make in November, Sims said. “Last night Romney came across as in control of the debate, and looked presidential: He helped himself a lot,” Sims said. “I think the Obama camp will have a different strategy next time around … as they move away from domestic policy to foreign policy it will be interesting to watch – we have a much closer race today than we did 24 hours ago.”last_img read more

Michael Phelps hails ‘incredible’ Kristof Milak after losing world record

first_imgLe Clos, who famously beat Phelps in the 2012 London Olympic final, shrugged: “Kristof is in another league — he’s a hell of a lot faster than all of us.”  Written By SUBSCRIBE TO US Last Updated: 25th July, 2019 16:31 IST Michael Phelps Hails ‘incredible’ Kristof Milak After Losing World Record Michael Phelps paid tribute to Hungarian teenager Kristof Milak’s “beautiful technique” after he took down the American legend’s long-standing 200 meters butterfly record at the world championships in South Korea. The 19-year-old Milak sliced a whopping 0.78 seconds off Phelps’s previous world best, which was achieved during the bodysuit era, after flirting with the record for much of the past season. Press Trust Of India “It happened because there was a kid who wanted to do it, who dreamed of doing it, who figured out what it would take to do it. (He) worked on his technique until it was beautiful and put in the really, really hard work that it takes to do it — my hat’s off to him,” said Phelps, who had a special fondness for the 200m fly. READ | ‘Too Much Gold In One Picture’: Twitterati Reacts On Seeing Olympic Legend Michael Phelps At Feroz Shah KotlaMilak became the first said Phelps, who had a special fondness for the 200m fly. swimmer to go under 1:51 minutes, while his winning margin was, remarkably, more than three seconds as Japan’s Daiya Seto finished a distant second and the South African Chad le Clos third. “As frustrated as I am to see that record go down, I couldn’t be happier to see how he did it. That kid’s last 100 was incredible. He put together a great 200 fly from start to finish,”  said Phelps 1 year ago Ashes: Ben Stokes the ‘real heartbeat’ of England team, says Ricky Ponting, making a big comparison Michael Phelps paid tribute to Hungarian teenager Kristof Milak’s “beautiful technique” after he took down the American legend’s long-standing 200 meters butterfly record at the world championships in South Korea.Phelps described Milak’s time of one minute, 50.73 seconds in Gwangju as “incredible”, although he admitted his astonishment was tinged with sadness at losing a world record which had stood since 2009. 1 year ago Jonty Rhodes applies for Team India fielding coach, multifaceted romance with India continuescenter_img First Published: 25th July, 2019 15:36 IST Milak said he was “honoured” to break a world record held by Phelps, who he had worshipped growing up and watched videos of to polish his technique. WE RECOMMEND WATCH US LIVE COMMENT FOLLOW US LIVE TV 1 year ago Team India jersey sponsor to change; Oppo, Byju’s and BCCI in tripartite agreement READ |  “I Questioned Whether Or Not I Wanted To Be Alive Anymore”: Greatest Ever Olympian Michael Phelps Reveals He Struggled With Depression “I wasn’t expecting to break the record,” he admitted. “But if you put in the hard work, good things happen and I was ready. I just tried to block everything out and find a good rhythmlast_img read more

Whos Who of Doctor Who New Companion Tosin Cole

first_img Unless you’re a fan of British teen soap operas, or an eagle-eyed Star Wars: The Force Awakens viewer, you probably don’t recognize Tosin Cole.Best known for his roles in The Cut, EastEnders: E20, and Hollyoaks (said British teen soap operas), Cole is one of three new companions set to travel through all of space and time with the Thirteenth Doctor.Playing Ryan to Bradley Walsh’s Graham and Mandip Gill’s Yasmin, the 25-year-old self-proclaimed sneakerhead entered showbiz less than a decade ago.With a few stage credits—including modern Julius Caesar retelling Wasted!—under his belt, Cole in 2010 made his screen debut in BBC series The Cut. And later secured the role of Sol Levi in EastEnders: E20, a Web-based spin-off of the Beeb’s popular London-set soap.Tosin Cole (and his adorable face) will join the Thirteenth Doctor in the TARDIS next year (via BBC)Working his way up (er … down?) the ladder, Cole was cast as Hollyoaks regular Neil Cooper from 2011-12. During his 84-episode stint on the Channel 4 teen drama, the English actor shared nine episodes with future Doctor Who colleague Gill (who played Phoebe McQueen between for three years).A few neglected movie and TV appearances and a bit part (as Red Four) in 2015’s highest-grossing film later, Cole has landed the gig of a lifetime (albeit short lifetime).In a surprise announcement last week, the BBC revealed its latest stars, thrusting relative unknowns Cole and Gill into the spotlight.Cole as Sol in “EastEnders: E20” (via BBC)“I’m grateful and excited to be a part of this journey with the team,” Cole said in a statement. “I’m looking forward to jumping in this Doctor Who universe.”Only 13 when the classic sci-fi show was resurrected by Russell T. Davies in 2005, Cole has shown no previous interest in or knowledge of the Whoniverse. Then again, neither did Pearl Mackie, whose tour de force as Twelfth Doctor companion Bill Potts still gives me chills.Newcomers Cole and Gill can expect to be at the center of media scrutiny over the next nine months, leading up to Doctor Who‘s full return in autumn 2018.Keep an eye on Geek for more on the new cast (including Sharon D. Clarke in a mysterious recurring role) and upcoming season (which has landed director Jamie Childs). HBO Max Scores Exclusive ‘Doctor Who’ Streaming RightsJo Tro Do Plo Plo No: ‘Doctor Who’ Welcomes Back Familiar Monster Stay on targetcenter_img Let us know what you like about Geek by taking our survey.last_img read more