Students to share research at Human Development Conference

first_imgStudents from across the country and the world will present original research this Friday and Saturday at the seventh annual Human Development Conference.Senior and conference co-chair Christopher Newton said the conference’s basic goals are the same as any other academic conference: “dissemination of research, networking of researchers and sharing experiences and methods.”However, what makes this conference unique are the students presenting, Newton said. The conference will be composed of primarily undergraduates, both from all over the country and some from the nations of Uganda and India, he said.“These are undergrads, and a lot of them have conducted field work,” Newton said. “They’ve actually gone out to these countries and engaged with the people most closely involved [with these issues]. That’s a very difficult undertaking, so sharing how you go about that and what your experiences were is really valuable at this early stage of people’s development with that type of work.”Junior and conference co-chair Maggie Guzman said the diversity of participants at the conference will foster discussion throughout the weekend.“The purpose [of the Human Development Conference] is to create an environment of discussion, of debate, focusing on the future of development,” Guzman said. “This is a very interdisciplinary conference. We have students from all over the world and representing different majors. And they’re talking about different topics.”The inspiration behind the conference’s theme of “envision, enact, evaluate” was inspired by the expiration of the Millennium Development Goals in 2015 and the work to develop the Sustainable Development Goals to take their place, Newton said.“There’s the big picture [at the conference] of international development at large heading towards a crossroads,” he said.Jeffrey Sachs, who was highly involved in the creation of the Millennium Development Goals, will give the conference’s keynote address. The conference also boasts 16 different panels throughout the weekend, each of which addresses a different area of development, Newton said.“You could be going to a global health panel, and you could be getting national healthcare provision in Mexico and treatment of lymphatic filariasis in the Dominican Republic,” he said. “… That’s what we love personally about it — it’s just incredible the things that people are doing.”Even those who are not interested in doing research in development will benefit from listening to their peers at the conference, Guzman said.“It doesn’t just have to be only research, but if you’re interested in doing an internship, going abroad — getting a feel for the culture, the problems, the politics involved, the state of development in that region — that’s also very important,” she said. “We have very big focus and representation from all of the different areas around the world, so even if you have a slight interest in exploring the world, this is a great way to get exposed to the problems we are currently facing internationally.”Students are required to register for the conference if they plan to attend the event’s keynote address. Registration and more information on the conference is located on the Kellogg Institute’s website.Tags: Dominican Republic, Human Development Conference, Jeffrey Sachs, Mexicolast_img read more

Wenger to amend offside law in a bid to end VAR row

first_img Promoted ContentBest & Worst Celebrity Endorsed Games Ever Made9 Facts You Should Know Before Getting A TattooBirds Enjoy Living In A Gallery Space Created For ThemWhich Country Is The Most Romantic In The World?Who Is The Most Powerful Woman On Earth?20 Completely Unexpected Facts About ‘The Big Bang Theory’6 Ridiculous Health Myths That Are Actually True14 Hilarious Comics Made By Women You Need To Follow Right NowWhat Happens To Your Brain When You Play Too Much Video Games?6 Incredibly Strange Facts About HurricanesHere Are The Top 10 Tiniest Mobile Phones On The Planet!15 Celebs You Probably Didn’t Expect To Be Cheerleaders A player will be deemed onside if any part of the body which can legitimately score a goal is level or behind the last defender — even if other parts are in front. Arsene Wenger will change the offside law for next season to end VAR chaos.Advertisement And it will mean one of the most significant changes of the past two decades, re-balancing the game in favour of the attacker.Wenger plans to drive through the change this month in his role as Fifa’s head of global development where he is effectively the boss of the International FA Board, football’s lawmakers.Olivier Giroud’s disallowed goal for Chelsea against Man Utd would have stood under the new lawsCredit: Sky SportsHe said: “You will be not offside if any part of the body that can score a goal is in line with the last defender, even if other parts of the attacker’s body are in front.A player will be deemed onside if any part of the body which can legitimately score a goal is level or behind the last defender — even if other parts are in frontCredit: BBC“That will sort it out and you will no longer have decisions about millimetres and a fraction of the attacker being in front of the defensive line.”center_img Read Also: FIFA’s Plans To Improve VAR Offside Calls With Artificial IntelligenceWenger has drafted his proposals to be adopted at the annual general meeting of Ifab in Belfast on February 29.Each of the four Home Nations has one of the eight votes, with Fifa – led by Wenger – holding the other four.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Loading… last_img read more