Investing In History

first_img 12 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Make a comment Business News More Cool Stuff Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  At Home Investing In History In a time when even gold loses its value, the one thing that doesn’t is history. Bustamante Shows overflows with that. By FRANZ A.D. MORALES Published on Monday, May 20, 2013 | 3:59 pm Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena Subscribecenter_img Community News Community News Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy First Heatwave Expected Next Week Top of the News faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes HerbeautyInstall These Measures To Keep Your Household Safe From Covid19HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyKim To File For Divorce From Kanye West After 6 Years Of MarriageHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyCostume That Makes Actresses Beneath Practically UnrecognizableHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyShort On Time? 10-Minute Workouts Are Just What You NeedHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyAre You His Ms. Right? 12 Signs He Thinks You AreHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyAt 9 Years Old, This Young Girl Dazzled The World Of FashionHerbeautyHerbeauty EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS In this time of recession, many are wondering how to safely invest their money. Banks are not as stable as they once were, stocks are unpredictable, and gold is not as reliable.The answer lies in Bustamante Antique Shows and Book Fairs. Invest in history.Historical artifacts, especially the ones with good providence, fetch premium prices at shows and auctions, and very rarely does the value diminish. Each day you possess a piece of history, it increases in value.High-end antiques such as jewelry, art glass, furniture, porcelain and Greek amphoras are not only sound investments, but look absolutely gorgeous and enhances any home.How can one be sure when choosing a vintage piece that it is what it is represented to be? In earlier times a look at a vintage piece would give you a fair idea of its’ age and value, however with the proliferation of counterfeits in the market today, one can’t be too sure. It is reassuring to know that Bustamante exhibitors must abide by a strict code of ethics, included in their signed contract, one of the highest in the antique industry. Customers can shop with confidence.For over 39 years Bustamante has produced shows at the Pasadena Center and a majority of his dealers are 2nd and 3rd generation business owners. The next Bustamante Antique Show will be held at The Center June 7th , 8th and 9th , exhibiting many antiques of bygone times.To find out more about the upcoming Pasadena Show, visit http://www.bustamante-shows.com.last_img read more

Limerick GP warns that under-6 scheme will lead to “yellow pack”…

first_img Previous articleQuinlivan warns of ‘dishonest’ EU/ US dealNext article#VIDEO Latvian charged with Limerick murder John Keoghhttp://www.limerickpost.ie WhatsApp Limerick GP Dr Emmet KerinLIMERICK doctor and vice president of the National Association of General Practitioners (NAGP) Dr Emmet Kerin has warned that the Government’s scheme to provide free GP care for children under six will lead to “a yellow pack” service.And according to Dr Kerin, the majority of doctors in the region are opposed to the scheme and do not intend to sign up for it.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up He told the Limerick Post: “The general feeling is no. I have to acknowledge that there are practices that financially are really struggling, and this offer is nearly tempting to them in the short term. But from talking to other colleagues here, they are generally saying no.“The offer as it stands isn’t good for GPs, it’s not good for the future of the GP service and it’s not a good deal for patients.”Dr Kerin has criticised the Government for launching the scheme “to gain votes”He commented: “With all the gloss and the spin on it, it sounds like a great deal, but the substance isn’t there.  As a parent, you would think that it is a good scheme but actually it isn’t providing anything. It’s very hard to take on the Government, it’s an emotive issue for parents, of course they want their children to be looked after, but it’s not a free service.“I would have to reduce my consultation time from 15 minutes to seven minutes. We will end up with a yellow pack service. Patients will have shorter consultation times and they won’t get to see the same GP each time they come in. If a GP doesn’t know you, you’re more likely to be referred to A&E.”Dr Kerin explained that the scheme does not include additional tests or x-rays that may be necessary, and does not cover the cost of medication for chronic conditions.He added that the Government should prioritise providing care for patients with chronic conditions.“There are more than 9,000 children receiving a domiciliary allowance, they have chronic conditions like cancer or Down Syndrome, and they’re not entitled to a medical card,” he pointed out.He also warned that it would generate “an additional four million consultations” per year for GPs nationally, and that many practices do not have the manpower to deal with an increase in demand.The NAGP is urging doctors not to join the scheme, however individual GPs are free to decide whether or not to sign up.It has since emerged that the scheme will cost double the amount initially envisaged with Junior Health Minister Kathleen Lynch telling the Dáil last Thursday that the extra €30 million now required would not come from other health areas.Stating that the cost of the project was now expected to be €67 million, not €37 million, she said: “we may need a supplementary budget towards the end of the year”, but any extra funds would not impact on other services. Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live Twitter Predictions on the future of learning discussed at Limerick Lifelong Learning Festival Linkedin TAGSDr Emmet KerinhealthlimerickNational Association of General Practitioners (NAGP)Under-6 GP scheme Email Printcenter_img Vanishing Ireland podcast documenting interviews with people over 70’s, looking for volunteers to share their stories RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Limerick Artist ‘Willzee’ releases new Music Video – “A Dream of Peace” Advertisement Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed live Facebook NewsLimerick GP warns that under-6 scheme will lead to “yellow pack” medical serviceBy John Keogh – April 24, 2015 762 WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads last_img read more

‘A Place to Stay Tour’ concert

first_img Pinterest Facebook ‘A Place to Stay Tour’ concert Pinterest By Digital AIM Web Support – February 24, 2021 WhatsApp Previous articleGIRLS HIGH SCHOOL BASKETBALL: Odessa High falls late in close contest to Midland LeeNext article010318_UTPB_WT_A&M_men_04 Digital AIM Web Support Local Newscenter_img TAGS  Facebook Twitter Mid-Cities Church, 8700 State Highway 191, Midland, has scheduled “A Place to Stay Tour” concert from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Sunday. “A Place to Stay” is a free Texas-wide concert tour designed to raise awareness for children in the foster care system while educating community members on how to become part of the solution. The event features music from award winning songwriters Radney Foster, Kyle Hutton and more. For tickets or information, go online. WhatsApp Twitterlast_img read more

Injectable drug seen as potential treatment for flu, both seasonal and avian

first_imgOct 2, 2006 (CIDRAP News) – Recent tests suggest that an antiviral drug given by intravenous (IV) or intramuscular (IM) injection could eventually serve as another weapon against influenza, according to results presented at a conference last week.In animal studies, peramivir improved survival in mice and ferrets infected with H5N1 avian flu, according to a news release from BioCryst Pharmaceuticals Inc., Birmingham, Ala., which is developing the drug. The results were presented Sep 30 at the annual Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC) in San Francisco.In addition, in phase 1 clinical studies, IV and IM doses of peramivir produced high blood levels of the drug in human volunteers without causing any adverse events, according to Dr. Charles E. Bugg, PhD, chairman and chief executive of BioCryst.The clinical studies “showed you can achieve high blood levels in humans safely,” Bugg told CIDRAP News in an interview today. The combination of those results with the animal studies is promising, he said.Peramivir is a neuraminidase inhibitor, like the licensed antivirals oseltamivir (Tamiflu), and zanamivir (Relenza). Oseltamivir is an oral drug, while zanamivir is inhaled as a powder. Many countries have stockpiled oseltamivir on the assumption that it will help if the H5N1 virus sparks a pandemic.BioCryst started developing peramivir in 1998 in partnership with Johnson and Johnson, Bugg said. Early studies showed the drug inhibited flu viruses effectively, but when taken orally, its bioavailability was very low, which prompted Johnson and Johnson to pull out of the program.Because injectable peramivir looked promising in animals, the program was resurrected with help from the National Institutes of Health about a year ago, Bugg said. He explained that the company is developing an IV formulation intended for hospital patients and an IM formulation for outpatients.In the animal studies, four groups of mice were infected with an H5N1 virus and then were treated with either a single IM injection of peramvir, five daily IM injections, oral oseltamivir for 5 days, or an IM placebo injection daily for 5 days, according to the news release. The single-injection group had a 70% survival rate and the five-injection group a 80% survival rate, compared with 36% for the placebo group and 70% for the oseltamivir group.In the ferret experiment, one group received a daily IM injection for 5 days, while a second group received an IM placebo daily for 5 days. Eighty-six percent of the treated group survived, versus 43% of the placebo group, according to the news release.Bugg said treatment was started an hour after the animals were infected with the virus. He said additional studies will involve longer time lapses between exposure and the start of treatment.Results of the clinical studies were presented by flu expert Frederick Hayden, MD, of the University of Virginia. Three groups of volunteers received different IV doses of peramivir, and a fourth group received increasing IM doses once a day for 3 days, the company release said. “Preliminary safety results indicate that in the four studies, all doses were well-tolerated with no adverse laboratory events or ECG findings reported,” the statement said.”I think peramivir looks very promising,” said Hayden, as quoted in a Sep 29 Bloomberg News report. “It’s proven to have very good activity in single doses.”In an interview, Hayden told Bloomberg that injecting peramivir into the bloodstream or into muscle can produce blood levels 100 times higher than those seen with oral oseltamivir, now considered the most promising treatment for H5N1 infection.Last January the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) gave injectable peramivir fast-track status for regulatory approval, according to BioCryst. But Bugg said it would take at least several more years to gain FDA approval.”We’ll do a clinical trial this flu season, and then two more next season,” he said. “We’re looking at several more years.” He said the company will be meeting with the FDA soon to review the program and may have a better idea of the timeline after that.Bugg said plans also call for testing the drug in human H5N1 patients at sites in Thailand and Vietnam and also to make it available in Turkey, which had human cases early this year.”We’ll be trying to collect data from H5N1-infected patients in Southeast Asia in collaboration with the World Health Organization,” he said. “We’ll be on the front line to capture H5N1 if it occurs. But realistically we won’t have enough [patients] for a meaningful statistical analysis.”In a Sep 29 Reuters report, Bugg said peramivir is easier to make than Tamiflu. One Swiss manufacturer can make 1 metric ton of the drug in a month, enough to treat an estimated 8 million people, he said.See also:Oct 2 BioCryst release on peramivirhttp://investor.shareholder.com/biocryst/releasedetail.cfm?ReleaseID=213054last_img read more