Jamaicans Urged to Share Positive Customer Service Experiences

first_img “The lens that we look through will determine what we see, and if you are looking for negative customer service, you will get plenty of it. If we want to see an increase in service excellence across Jamaica, let us pay attention to and focus our energy on what we want more of,” she said. Story Highlights Chairman of the Jamaica Customer Service Association (JaCSA), Dr. Nsombi Jaja, is encouraging Jamaicans to recognise and celebrate service providers who, despite constraints, continue to deliver excellent customer service.center_img Chairman of the Jamaica Customer Service Association (JaCSA), Dr. Nsombi Jaja, is encouraging Jamaicans to recognise and celebrate service providers who, despite constraints, continue to deliver excellent customer service.“The lens that we look through will determine what we see, and if you are looking for negative customer service, you will get plenty of it. If we want to see an increase in service excellence across Jamaica, let us pay attention to and focus our energy on what we want more of,” she said.Dr. Jaja was speaking at the JaCSA leadership breakfast forum held at the Spanish Court Hotel in New Kingston on September 26.She encouraged the leaders to share their positive experiences about good customer service on social media.“Let us share our positive experiences on social media because we share the negative ones… and then it goes viral, and I am saying, why can’t we do the same thing and flood social media with positive experiences. Let us disrupt the narrative on customer service and shift the discussion to the positive experiences,” she urged.In doing so, she said “we will boost morale, and the team members will be motivated to go beyond the call of duty”.“Today, I am asking all of the leaders in this room, when you go back to the organisations, treat your employees just a little bit better, and let them know how you appreciate them,” Dr. Jaja added.The JaCSA will be observing National Customer Service Week from September 30 to October 6 under the theme ‘Be the Magic: The Making of Memorable Customer Experiences’ and will bring focus to the transformation that quality customer service can bring to the nation.The week of activities will begin with a church service at the Webster Memorial Church on Half-Way Tree Road. Other activities include the hosting of a micro and small business service excellence workshop, service excellence school tour, and a corporate mingle.For more information, contact JaCSA at 876-978-8668 or [email protected]last_img read more

Canadian astronaut David SaintJacques flaunts ties to the Arctic during QA with

first_imgLindsay RichardsonAPTN NewsStudents at a school in Umiujaq in northern Quebec got a special surprise on their last day of term – the chance to talk to an astronaut still in orbit.The satellite conversation between students at Kiluutaq School and astronaut David Saint-Jacques last Friday was thousands of kilometers in the making.Students prepared their questions in class earlier in the week, asking standard things like “why are you at the space station?” “How do you use the toilet?” “Is the internet faster in space?” “Do you see planes fly?”Some questions, however, were specifically related to the northern community of less than 500 people.“Can you see Umiujaq from space?” one student asked in French.“Yes, I can see Nunavik here from the window – it’s very easy to recognize Hudson Bay, the Lac Guillaume de l’Ile – one of the most beautiful places I’ve seen in my life,” Saint Jacques replied.“We can see it very well from space.”Saint Jacques used to be co-chief of medicine in nearby Puvirnituq.His wife, Dr. Veronique Morin, who moderated Friday’s Q&A session, was once a village doctor in Umiujaq.Together, the high school sweethearts share a love for Nunavik.“I think once you live in the north, the north lives within you, and David likes to say there’s a piece of the tundra with him on board the space station,” Morin explained.Even though he’s spent six months aboard the space station, cruising 480 kilometres above the earth while studying infectious diseases, Saint Jacques does in fact carry a piece of Quebec’s north with him on-board.It was a heartwarming revelation for one student – a young girl inquiring about an ivory ring made by her grandfather before she was born.Saint-Jacques raised his hand to the camera, showing off the white band still poised on his ring finger.“I’m wearing this ring was made by Daniel Kumarluk, and if you ask Dr. Morin, my wife, she has a very similar ring because this is the ring we used to get engaged and then to get married,” he explained. “So we have a little bit of Umiujaq with us throughout our life.”Saint-Jacques also took the opportunity to show off a sealskin cuff made by artist Victoria Okpik, and a pair of tiny artisanal mittens “for good luck.”“I brought a few souvenirs of my life in the Arctic with me up in space,” he said.“That was a really touching moment for everyone,” Dr. Morin explained after the Q&A. “You could feel the connection that people felt to David, and seeing a part of their own community being in space was, I think, a moment of awakening for many.”[email protected]@sentimtllast_img read more