Why Fujitsu’s broadband plan will probably fail

first_img whatsapp GEEK [email protected]_DinneenFujitsu is planning to roll out superfast broadband to 5m rural homes. That’s good, right? Broadband for you, broadband for me, broadband for everybody. We can all meet in a chat-room and discuss how great it is that someone in a bothy in rural Aberdeenshire can download the back-catalogue of My Family instead of being forced to stare interminably into the fire like a rabbit caught in the headlights of modern civilisation.While Fujitsu is playing its cards very close to its chest in terms of where it will build this infrastructure, and what “rural” even really means, it seems it will be targeting the “final third” of the UK left after BT connects the rest of the country by 2015. We’re talking some seriously isolated areas here; Welsh valleys and Cumbrian mountainsides. And all Fujitsu says it needs to drag these people kicking and screaming from their Kafkaesque nightmare is £500m of the £830m of government money earmarked for the roll out of next generation internet.Being a selfish, navel-gazing city dweller, the argument that we shouldn’t be spending quite so much to connect some of these places holds some sway. Small and medium-sized towns, the places worst hit by the recession, need the investment that follows broadband roll-out more desperately than just about anyone – but should we really be paying for the next generation internet of someone choosing to live in the rolling hills of Northumbria? These people are greeted every morning by crisp clean air and ride to work through fields of daisies on the backs of wild horses, while city dwellers are forced to wade face deep through a fetid sea of human slurry. Surely we should at least be able to dazzle them with our technology like Neanderthal man waving a flaming torch at an angry ape?But this is largely redundant when you consider it looks unlikely that Fujitsu will be able to fund its ambitious plans. Firstly, it would need to win almost all of the public money, which will be released in small chunks for local governments to bid for and despite going head-to-head with BT. Fujitsu has admitted that if public funding falls below a certain level it may be unable to proceed. It also relies on BT reducing the amount it charges for access to its duct and pole infrastructure, which analysts are sceptical about.Finally, Fujitsu has remained tight-lipped on whether there will be a premium charged for people living in rural areas for the privilege of this network. While the point of the project is to help remove the digital divide, this could risk erecting yet another barrier. Monday 18 April 2011 9:34 pm whatsapp Why Fujitsu’s broadband plan will probably fail KCS-content Show Comments ▼ More From Our Partners Russell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgKiller drone ‘hunted down a human target’ without being told tonypost.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgSupermodel Anne Vyalitsyna claims income drop, pushes for child supportnypost.comA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.org Share Tags: NULLlast_img read more

Portugal iGaming Dashboard – Q4 2020

first_img Topics: Casino & games Finance Sports betting Poker Slots 12th April 2021 | By Joanne Christie Finance Portugal iGaming Dashboard – Q4 2020 Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter And though its performance was not quite as impressive as sports betting, casino revenue also broke records during the fourth quarter of 2020. GGR rose to a new high of €49.1m, up 17.7% on the previous quarter and 53.4% on the same period of 2019. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter It was largely sports betting that pushed the market up to €113.2m in the fourth quarter, a figure that represented a 34.4% quarter-on-quarter rise and a 73% increase on the final quarter of 2019. Slots made up the bulk of this (71.1%), followed by French roulette (12.6%) and blackjack (6.4%). The market shares of both cash and tournament poker declined further in the fourth quarter, after significant falls in Q3, with 30% and 87.5% decreases in their respective market shares on a year-on-year basis. Punters were so keen to return to betting after the Covid-19-related sporting shutdowns that the vertical swung back to a decisive lead over casino in the quarter. In Q4 sports betting accounted for 56.6% of the market, the highest percentage since 2017.center_img Although Portugal didn’t look to have experienced the same poker boost as other markets while sports betting was unavailable last year, interestingly it does seem to have seen the same slump in poker since sports came back online. Ficom Leisure provides monthly figures on the New Jersey online market in the New Jersey iGaming Dashboard and Pennsylvania in the Pennsylvania iGaming Dashboard, available on iGB North America. It also provides quarterly figures on the Spanish online market in the Spain iGaming Dashboard, as well as monthly figures on the Italian market in the Italy iGaming Dashboard. Regions: Europe Western Europe Portugal All data and figures are processed by Ficom Leisure following the the official release of the figures by Portuguese regulator the Serviço de Regulação e Inspeção de Jogos (SRIJ). Ficom Leisure is a leading European corporate advisory firm specialising in all segments of the betting and gaming sector. Football was the most popular sport with bettors by some distance, making up 86.7% of turnover, followed by basketball at 5.2% and tennis at 4.9%. Sports betting GGR accounted for €64.1m of this, up more than 50% on the previous quarter and 92% on the same period the previous year. Email Address Portugal’s igaming market enjoyed another record-breaking quarter at the end of 2020, with revenue beating the market’s previous high by more than a third. Scroll down to see the full interactive datasets.last_img read more

Premier Paints Plc (PREMPA.ng) 2003 Annual Report

first_imgPremier Paints Plc (PREMPA.ng) listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchange under the Building & Associated sector has released it’s 2003 annual report.For more information about Premier Paints Plc (PREMPA.ng) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Premier Paints Plc (PREMPA.ng) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Premier Paints Plc (PREMPA.ng)  2003 annual report.Company ProfilePremier Paints Plc manufactures and markets paint and coating products for the decorative, industrial and commercial sectors in Nigeria. The decorative range includes emulsion, gloss and textured products; the industrial range includes red oxide primer, bright aluminum paint for street light poles, bridge railings and storage tanks, and black bituminous paint, quick dry cellulose, fast dry enamel, primer surfacer, alkyd floor paint, epoxy floor paint, roof paint and stoving enamel paint; the marine range includes epoxy hybrid paint, epoxy primer red paint, epoxy finish paint and polyurethane finish paint; the wood finishes range includes a glossy finish for interior and exterior wood surfaces; the auto refinishes range includes solid, metallic, varnish and primer; thinners and solvents include a biocidal solution to control the growth of biocide, fungicide and algaecide; and the company produces a product for road marking. Premier Paint Company is a subsidiary of Red Sea Housing Services Company Limited. The company head office is in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Premier Paints Plc is listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchangelast_img read more

FMBcapital Holdings Plc (FMBCH.mw) HY2011 Interim Report

first_imgFMBcapital Holdings Plc (FMBCH.mw) listed on the Malawi Stock Exchange under the Banking sector has released it’s 2011 interim results for the half year.For more information about FMBcapital Holdings Plc (FMBCH.mw) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the FMBcapital Holdings Plc (FMBCH.mw) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: FMBcapital Holdings Plc (FMBCH.mw)  2011 interim results for the half year.Company ProfileFMBcapital Holdings (FMBCH) is the Mauritius based holding company for the FMBcapital Group and was listed on the Malawi Stock Exchange in September 2017 following a one for one share swap with First Merchant Bank of Malawi shareholders. FMBCH has banking and finance operations in Botswana, Malawi, Mozambique, Zambia and Zimbabwe. It is primarily an investment holding company with interests as follows: First Capital Bank, Malawi – 100% (established June 1995)First Capital Bank, Botswana – 38,60% (established July 2008)Capital Bank Mozambique – 70% (acquired June 2013)First Capital Bank, Zambia – 49% (acquired June 2013)First Capital Bank in association with Barclays – 62% (acquired October 2017) Through its subsidiaries, FMBCH offers a comprehensive range of financial products and services to both corporate and retail sectors. The Global Credit Rating Co. has consistently given FMB an annual Long Term Rating of A+ and a Short Term Rating of A1 since 2007. FMBcapital Holdings Plc is listed on the Malawi Stock Exchangelast_img read more

Medical And Surgical Centre Limited (MASC.mu) HY2014 Interim Report

first_imgMedical And Surgical Centre Limited (MASC.mu) listed on the Stock Exchange of Mauritius under the Health sector has released it’s 2014 interim results for the half year.For more information about Medical And Surgical Centre Limited (MASC.mu) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Medical And Surgical Centre Limited (MASC.mu) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Medical And Surgical Centre Limited (MASC.mu)  2014 interim results for the half year.Company ProfileMedical And Surgical Centre Limited deals within the Healthcare and Cafeteria segments where it operates hospitals in Mauritius. The company is a subsidiary of CIEL Healthcare Limited and operates hospitals under the Fortis Clinique Darné and Wellkin Hospital names, as well as runs a one day care centre under the FCD North name. Medical And Surgical Centre Limited is listed on the Stock Exchange of Mauritius.last_img read more

I’d buy these cheap FTSE 100 dividend stocks to get rich and retire early

first_img Enter Your Email Address Simply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this. Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Shares I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner.But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared.What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations.And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. Rupert Hargreaves owns shares of Unilever and Royal Dutch Shell. The Motley Fool UK owns shares of and has recommended Unilever. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Sage Group. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee. Image source: Getty Images center_img Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997” I’d buy these cheap FTSE 100 dividend stocks to get rich and retire early The recent stock market crash means many FTSE 100 shares now trade at low levels not seen since 2009. Unfortunately, for some companies, this pessimism is warranted. As the coronavirus crisis continues, many sectors and businesses will experience challenging trading conditions in the near term.However, in the long run, these companies should be able to return to growth. As such, investors should take a long-term view of the stock market’s prospects and look to capitalise on the low valuations available in the FTSE 100 today.5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…Outlook uncertainIt’s impossible to tell when the FTSE 100 will stop falling. The market has stabilised over the past week. But we still don’t know how much of an impact the coronavirus crisis will have on the global economy.Some analysts believe we’re only just starting to see what could be a prolonged economic depression. Others are more upbeat. But most economists agree the global economy will shrink this year.Nevertheless, the economy has a solid track record of recovering from even the most severe downturns.Its performance generally lags investor sentiment. It’s often the case that the FTSE 100 has started its recovery long before the economy begins to show signs of improvement. In other words, if you wait for the economic recovery to start before investing, it could be too late.This means buying stocks when their prospects are uncertain could be the best option.FTSE 100 diversificationAs it’s impossible to tell when the stock market and economy will recover, diversifying across a range of FTSE 100 shares is vital.Buying and holding a small number of cheap shares may be tempting, but this strategy can be risky. Just one loss could mean a big set-back for your portfolio. Therefore, owning a basket of FTSE 100 shares that operate in varied geographies and industries could improve your risk/reward prospects.High-quality dividend stocks appear to be the best options in the current market. Companies like Unilever and Reckitt Benckiser, which manufacture and produce essential products for consumers.Software provider Sage could also be a good option. The company’s subscription business provides a regular income stream and businesses will still need to complete their accounts no matter how bad the crisis.Rentokil Initial, meanwhile, has seen a rise in demand for its disinfection and deep clean services. This is helping the FTSE 100 constituent pull through the crisis, and management is already planning the group’s exit strategy.Shares in oil majors BP and Shell are dealing close to the lowest prices of the past decade. However, both companies are still committed to their dividends, are well funded, and have been slashing costs to improve liquidity.All of these businesses are trading at levels not seen for months. This suggests now could be an excellent time for long-term investors to capitalise on these low valuations. Rupert Hargreaves | Sunday, 19th April, 2020 See all posts by Rupert Hargreaveslast_img read more

It’s time for baby boomers to cede control

first_img Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Smithfield, NC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Submit an Event Listing [Religion News Service] As baby boomers start clicking the senior citizen box on travel fares, I want to say a word to my generation and to the one that preceded us.It is time for us to get out of the way.I don’t mean easing into wheelchairs. For the most part, we’re way too healthy and energetic for that. I mean the harder work of relinquishing control.I see that need most clearly in religious institutions, where I work. But I see it elsewhere, too, from taxpayer “revolts” led by seniors against today’s schoolchildren to culture wars that we won’t let die.At a stage in life when God wants us to “dream dreams,” we are fighting against change and empowering demagogues who use our control issues as cover for their soak-the-people, feed-the-rich schemes — including playing political football with our own Medicare and Social Security benefits.I see this most clearly in mainline Protestant churches, which are literally dying under the weight of old ideas, old methods, old expectations, and old leaders who behave as if they would rather see their congregations die than yield control.Healthiest congregations tend to be startups, not because young startup pastors are more capable, but because they don’t have older members standing in their way.I see it in suburban communities where older taxpayers are rejecting school spending that would benefit a younger generation’s children.I see it in progressive seminaries, where older leaders are still fighting feminist battles in a post-feminist era. I see it in the Roman Catholic Church, where old men are forcing yet another generation to fight the abortion battle that gave them purpose after Vatican II.I saw it in crowd shots at both parties’ national conventions. In a nation where the average age is said to be 25 and the nonwhite presence is growing, both parties seemed oddly old and, at the GOP’s convention, oddly white.I doubt that younger cadres are any wiser or more skilled. Many, in fact, are proving unprepared for complex decision-making. But the answer to that is training and experience on the job, not exclusion.I doubt that today’s fresh ideas have magical properties. Some new ideas in technology seem shallow and trivial. But fresh ideas at 25 can mature into better ideas at 35 — if their creators are allowed air to breathe.In what seems like another lifetime, we once shouted for attention and demanded that older cadres get out of our way. Fine. That’s what youth does. But we are still shouting for attention, still demanding control. Why?I think many are addicted to control. By that I mean an addiction comparable to alcoholism, an addiction we will feed at any cost even though it makes our lives unmanageable.I think many are afraid of aging. We hear “senior” and think loss, frailty, sagging, and dependency. We think empty days and empty bank accounts. Clinging to control seems a way to avoid time’s “ever-rolling stream.”In fact, thanks to improved health care, many in their 60s and 70s feel as healthy and energetic as ever. I think we could be using our health to serve. Serve those who truly are on the final laps and dealing with loneliness, depression, anxiety and failing health. Serve our beloved institutions by saying yes when young leaders ask us to be foot soldiers. And serve our communities by caring for the least.— Tom Ehrich is a writer, church consultant and Episcopal priest based in New York. He is the author of “Just Wondering, Jesus” and founder of the Church Wellness Project. His website is www.morningwalkmedia.com. Follow Tom on Twitter (at)tomehrich. The Very Rev. Dr. Joyce Beaulieu says: Rector Washington, DC Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME the Rev’d Dr. Elizabeth Kaeton says: Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL September 13, 2012 at 4:53 pm I couldn’t disagree more. Power in society, but especially in the church, is something that ought to be wielded by everyone, young, old, male, female, white people, people of color, solely on the basis of ability. No one should be excluded from leadership because they’re “too old”. I’m afraid that Tom’s point, while well-meant, is going to lead some to pushing seniors out of leadership positions and out of the church. I want no part of a church like that. September 13, 2012 at 4:28 pm The words “cede control” seem provocative and divisive. They suggest that those over 48 years of age have nothing to offer the church – after all, the Boomer generation (according to generational demographics) did not end until 1964. Can we not put this battle between Boomers and GenXers behind us and get on with respecting everyone’s gifts and doing the ministry to which we are all called…together? September 13, 2012 at 4:21 pm Thanks for your thoughts. When I turned 60 this May, I decided my parish needed a more energetic presence and I stepped away. I can’t agree with you more that, as a generation, it’s time to let the next generations have a go at the systems they need to control. Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Dan Furgason says: Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Eleanor W. Winsor says: Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA September 13, 2012 at 4:34 pm I absolutely agree about mentoring! Rector Knoxville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ The Rev. Kim Hardy says: (The Rev.) Ronald L. Reed says: John Kirk says: Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Comments are closed. Featured Events Marilyn Grantham says: Donald Hill says: Comments (25) Press Release Service September 13, 2012 at 6:18 pm The following paragraph is unnecessary to your argument Tom; and, frankly, it turned me off to your overall message. Just who is the demagogue here?“At a stage in life when God wants us to “dream dreams,” we are fighting against change and empowering demagogues who use our control issues as cover for their soak-the-people, feed-the-rich schemes — including playing political football with our own Medicare and Social Security benefits.” The Rev. Kim Hardy says: September 13, 2012 at 4:22 pm I absolutely agree that it’s time – past time – for Boomer men to cede control. If you can’t be part of the change and follow the lead of the new generation, get out of the way. One of the best ways to lead is by helping to train up and empower the next generation. Becky Robbins-Penniman says: Director of Music Morristown, NJ The Rev. Michael Link says: September 13, 2012 at 5:06 pm We will all gain when we allow change to occur. Thank-you for saying it so well. The Boomers might even find that there are exciting new things with which to fill there time. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK September 14, 2012 at 3:28 pm AS the leading edge of the boomer generation I find I can still serve to encourage the sharing and ceding of power to the younger generations. What is most difficult is to find people of younger those demographics willing to take the amount of time it will require to remold and reform the church into new models of servant leadership. When there is a vacuum the elders will step up and do. Lets not demonize them for that. Rector Belleville, IL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Doug Desper says: September 13, 2012 at 5:20 pm As a geriatric social worker with 33 years in various aspects of the field, before retiring, I see lots of holes in this essay! I’m 65 and active in my church. I think we older adults need to provide leadership, to mentor those coming up behind us.It’s our job to keep The Church together until the youngsters are ready to take over. As a saying I read recently said, “Older adults ARE the church of today!” A dear friend is pastoring in the United Methodist Church in North Florida. She tells me in another 20 years, there will be no UMC in Florida. Why? Because the current average age is 70.Will the up-starts, the GenXer’s, Millenniums, and iGeneration be ready? Not if us old folks sit on the sidelines!Will the upstarts Robert Smith says: Bee Jay Mar says: Submit a Press Release New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Pittsburgh, PA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group September 15, 2012 at 2:57 pm Becky, what you say about buildings is now and will be a massive crisis very soon. The average building requires about $55K per year “to live.” The same is of course true if a building has be “mothballed.” Check out commercial real estate just about anywhere in cities and towns, and there are already many church buildings for sale at a fraction of their insured value.Re. the Boomer participation, there is certainly a place of us but should the average age of newly minted clergy for 48? We must quit ordaining so many middle to elderly clergy and provide well financed education for younger men and women to take over our ordained leadership. Those new priests, yes, we can help mentor them! An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET September 17, 2012 at 1:28 pm Considering the reality of the statisics of who is actually present and supporting most local Episcopal Churches each week I can only say “thank God for our reliable seasoned citizens” who are present, willing, paying the bills, and holding the doors open in hopes that one day others will follow their example! Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS September 13, 2012 at 5:49 pm As a United Methodist, I agree on behalf of my denomination! When I was active in conference and jurisdictional work I was appalled by all the 80 and 90-year-old retired people who held offices, and vowed then that I would begin mentoring younger people to grow into leadership roles. We Boomers were vocal about wanting younger leadership in our country, so let’s take our own good advice and lift up and nurture younger leaders. Rector Shreveport, LA September 15, 2012 at 6:43 am One area not mentioned specifically would be secular jobs. While a number of seniors need supplemental income, many do not, but continue to hold onto jobs that could be filled by the under/unemployed. Volunteer work can be most meaningful and helpful for all involved. Salin Low says: This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 September 18, 2012 at 5:15 pm Dear Robert:Don’t be offended. The author simply doesn’t grasp that truth is immutable and the age of the person either professing or denying that truth is irrelevant to that truth’s immutability (strange, isn’t it, in an ecclesial community that embraces gay marriage, permits openly gay bishops, “ordains” women priests, etc., that this egregious ageism is tolerated). Nor does he grasp that a large number of people actually DO believe that abortion is a grave and dreadful sin. It’s because his own ecclesial community isn’t quite sure what it believes in any more, at least in terms of sin, redemption, salvation, etc., though they can quote the Millenium Development Goals to a fair- thee-well. As a former Episcopalian turned happily Roman Catholic some twenty-four years ago, I would urge you to pray for the author’s repentance and for the continued expansion of the personal ordinariate authorized by the Holy Father in “Anglicanorum Coetibus,” that more and more Anglicans will come into the unity that is inherently and inalienably the essence of Holy Mother Church’s very nature. Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Albany, NY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET John Schaffer says: September 18, 2012 at 6:31 am This commentary, while hopeful and idealistic, ignores the well-documented statistical reality of who is actually present, willing, and reliably supporting the Episcopal Church these days – that is, our older members. Thank God for our “seasoned citizens” who continue to be the Church in season and out. September 13, 2012 at 6:16 pm After fifty-one years of parish ministry including five interims since “retirement,” I will continue to assist younger clergy, when asked to do so, but I will no longer lead. Not only do I have insufficient energy, but I know that my concerns and preaching address questions and situations past. Also, while I am relatively tech-savy for my age, when I am around younger clergy I become away of how much they are–and need to be–beyond me and most of our congregations. The Rev. Betsy Carmody Gonzalez says: Featured Jobs & Calls It’s time for baby boomers to cede control October 12, 2013 at 4:20 pm Right on. We were all called by out Lord to do this together. It is not us and them. Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Fr. Charles Searls Ridge says: September 14, 2012 at 10:07 am When I spent my sabbatical in 2009 visiting “emerging church” groups (not just Episcopalians – lots of different flavors, including independent), I asked them what they thought of someone like me, who was old enough to be their mom (if not their grandmother) taking part in the movement/conversation. Would they prefer we not horn in? To a person, these youngsters said, “Don’t go away! we need your wisdom. BUT, do let us make our own mistakes, and do let us talk about things you don’t understand (especially in pop culture) without getting bent out of shape. There’s nothing lamer than an AARP member trying to be a hipster.”Those of us Boomer parents who were NOT helicopter parents are perfectly capable of walking with and encouraging younger folks without being overbearing or jealous, whether it is at home or in the workplace or in the church. But the phenomenon of the helicopter parent (not only a Boomer parenting issue, by the way) is also a factor in all those spheres. Perhaps that’s where the conversation needs to focus – on intergenerational respect and trust and interest in what life is like for the other.Personally, I think the biggest church challenge looming in the next 20 years or so will be the buildings. If you ask my 20-something kids, “Which should the church be spending money on? fixing up old sanctuaries, or feeding the hungry, clothing the naked, and visiting the sick and the prisoners?”, they just laugh. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab James Maury says: Rector Collierville, TN Statements and opinions expressed in the articles and communications herein, are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of Episcopal News Service or the Episcopal Church. Associate Rector Columbus, GA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC By Tom EhrichPosted Sep 13, 2012 Robert Sherwood says: September 13, 2012 at 6:06 pm I, too, agree with your article. I am at the tag end of the Silent Generation and in my 47 years of ministry, I have found that the “Silents” are more generous, supportive, and do not seek to be rewarded by accolades for their good works.The Boomers, you say, are addicted to control. I’ll add another adjective, “entitled.” Some even may lack emotional maturity. There are hundreds and hundreds of exceptions.Perhaps what the generations after the boomers need to do is create an intervention to heal the boomers. Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit a Job Listing Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group September 13, 2012 at 5:07 pm Wonderful commentary. I am classic baby boomer, I am not ready to give up active justice work, but am honored that the leadership in community organizing are those in the 25-35 yr. old range.I am so excited to see and follow this new leadership. Susan Willm says: September 13, 2012 at 4:35 pm I think the commentary said all Boomers should get out of the way, not just the men. We need to let the next generations define and fight their own battles. Rector Tampa, FL September 17, 2012 at 5:56 pm “I see it in progressive seminaries, where older leaders are still fighting feminist battles in a post-feminist era. I see it in the Roman Catholic Church, where old men are forcing yet another generation to fight the abortion battle that gave them purpose after Vatican II.” As a 24 year old Roman Catholic seminarian I was horribly offended by this statement. Since the earliest days of America the Episcopal Church has treated Catholics like children, telling us how we should believe and what we should do. How can you insinuate that our seminaries “force” things on us when you are not a Roman Catholic priest, do not profess the Roman Catholic faith, or teach at Roman Catholic seminary? You have frankly shown a typically historical anti-Catholic attitude towards us in many of your posts. I assure you that I, and every other Roman Catholic Seminarian, will continue to fight the battle with abortion long after the babyboomers are dead, as will those who follow in our footsteps. We follow because we want to to fight the good fight for what we believe is the truth of the gospel. NOT because we are “forced.” Indeed my generation of Catholics is far more antiabortion than our parents. But once again a protestant is critiquing our church. It should be a point of pride for Episcopalians, that it was an Episcopalian of the babyboomer generation who urged the Episcopal Church to acknowledged its long standing anti-Catholic sentiments, rooted in an Anglo fear of the Irish and Polish and do away with them. Sadly the lessons of Philip Jenkins seem to be forgotten. I usually have nothing but the deepest respect and indeed, love, for the Episcopal Church, but your statements about our seminaries were uncalled for, unwarranted, and frankly, hurtful. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ September 17, 2012 at 1:48 pm Rev. Kim,Thank-you, thank you, thank you! In this commentary one finds talk of power, divisiveness, and gender-bias (“Boomer men”). Jesus didn’t seek to toss anyone to the sides as much as many comments here do – and Jesus never spoke so degradingly of those concerned enough to follow Him. In all of this I read about “get out of the way”, power, control, empower, fight their battles….how about “servanthood”, a concept so lacking in this entire discussion? If it were not for the sacrifices – and I mean sacrifices – of many of the elderly parishioners in our churches then this website, this denomination, and many local churches would not have a thin dime to slam them with. Doug Desper says: Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET September 13, 2012 at 11:04 pm As a Gen Xer, I just want a place at the table, an invitation into leadership and shaping where the church is and the possibilities of where God is leading us. Previous generations carry the DNA of who we are. We map that DNA to discover who we are and where our traditional struggles and where challenges lie. Terms like “intergenerational” and “multigenerational” used in faith settings are not terms made up by boomers who still want control, but used freely by younger folks who value where we are and have been on the road to what is next and to God’s kingdom. Dianne Aid says: AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC September 13, 2012 at 4:27 pm I can agree with much of what Tom Ehrich is saying. I belong to the “silent” generation that preceeded the boomers and I have long been taken aback by their overt aggressiveness and constant need for attention. I think it is time they recognized their faults and demonstrated some healthy humility. However, I also watched all of the Democratic National Convention and was bought to tears by the rainbow of people in attendance … far more of a cross-section of America now than was present at the Republication Convention. I have real hope for our future because of that diversity. Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Martinsville, VA Doug Desper says: Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Youth Minister Lorton, VAlast_img read more

Archbishop invites more young Christians to spend ‘a year in…

first_img Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Washington, DC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Anglican Communion, Rector Bath, NC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Featured Jobs & Calls Featured Events The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Youth Minister Lorton, VA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Albany, NY Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit an Event Listing Rector Belleville, IL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA [Lambeth Palace] Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby has invited more young Christians to join the Community of St. Anselm at Lambeth Palace.Applications open today for the second year of the program, which offers people aged 20-35 the opportunity to spend “a year in God’s time” as they live together as a community inspired by the monastic traditions.The participants commit to a year of prayer, studying theology and ethics, and serving the poorest in local communities, adopting a pattern of life devoted to Jesus Christ that monastics down the centuries would recognize.The first year of the program has seen 36 young men and women forming a community based at Lambeth Palace. Sixteen residential members from around the world – including the USA, Kenya and Australia – have been joined by 20 non-residential members who live and work in London. The second intake will start in September 2016.Welby has made the renewal of prayer and religious life a priority for his ministry.The Prior of St. Anselm, Anders Litzell said: “I’m looking for people who above everything else want to follow Jesus, grow in likeness of Jesus by the inspiration of the Holy Spirit and to the glory of God the Father. It is as simple as that. You can come from any Christian denomination and any part of the world.“Our first intake have been here for three and a half months and it’s been an extraordinary journey. It’s been beautiful, it’s been challenging, it has been of God and I am deeply humbled, very excited for what the rest of this year will hold for the current members.”Shannon Preston, a residential member from Minnesota, USA, said: “Having two hours a day to pray is unreal and I’m not sure where I would get that outside of this year. I show up and trust that God is there as well. It’s such a gift.”For more details visit the Community of St. Anselm website: www.stanselm.org.ukTo listen to an interview with Prior Anders Liztell and Community members:https://soundcloud.com/lambethpalace/sets/community-of-st-anselm Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books center_img Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Tampa, FL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit a Press Release Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Archbishop invites more young Christians to spend ‘a year in God’s time’ Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Martinsville, VA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Rector Columbus, GA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Press Release Service Rector Collierville, TN Rector Shreveport, LA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Course Director Jerusalem, Israel An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Tags The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Archbishop of Canterbury Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Smithfield, NC Posted Dec 14, 2015 last_img read more

New Zealand churches open new ecumenical unity dialogue

first_img Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Collierville, TN Comments (1) Submit a Job Listing New Zealand churches open new ecumenical unity dialogue Curate Diocese of Nebraska Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Hugh Hansen PhD says: March 8, 2016 at 9:48 am Perhaps New Zealand can become a prototype for how we want churches all over the world to treat one another. Further, shouldn’t there be active dialogue between each of us and one another? Comments are closed. Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Martinsville, VA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Bath, NC Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Posted Mar 7, 2016 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Tags Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit an Event Listing [Anglican Taonga] Leaders of Anglican, Methodist and Roman Catholic churches in New Zealand have launched a new platform for conversation and work together, to be known as the National Dialogue for Christian Unity (NDCU).Meeting in Wellington on Feb. 25, leaders of the three churches said they hope the NDCU will lead to increased ecumenical collaboration among churches and Christian agencies on issues concerning all New Zealanders.Church representatives used the day-long meeting to set in motion a new structure for dialogue, before joining in a service of celebration at Sacred Heart Cathedral, Wellington.“The formal establishment of the NDCU represents a significant and very hopeful development in ecumenical relationships in Aotearoa New Zealand,” Archbishop Philip Richardson, bishop of Taranaki and archbishop of the Anglican Church of Aotearoa, New Zealand and Polynesia, said.“Friendships between churches have been strong, so to give structure and form to these is cause for rejoicing.”“The ecumenical initiative is a sign of a new hope,” agreed the Rev.Prince Devanandan, director of mission and ecumenical relations for the Methodist Church of New Zealand.“Since the Conference of Churches was abandoned, nearly a decade has passed,” he explained. “The churches that are committed to Christian unity – Anglican, Methodist and Roman Catholic – have continued their dialogue to reach this historical moment.”The Salvation Army and Presbyterian Church of Aotearoa New Zealand also took part as observers, while ecumenical organization Christian World Service and Student Christian Movement Aotearoa turned out in support.Formal dialogue between Maori churches continues through the Maori ecumenical gathering, Te Runanga Whakawhanaunga i Nga Hahi o Aotearoa.Mele’ana Puloka, World Council of Churches (WCC) president for the Pacific, attended the NDCU forum and brought greetings on behalf of the WCC.“Today is a day of celebration,” she said. “It is a day of hope. It is a day of new beginning. The God of Life is always at work among us; we see this as the National Dialogue for Christian Unity becomes a reality in this inaugural meeting.”The WCC general secretary, the Rev. Dr Olav Fykse Tveit, will visit WCC member churches and others in Aotearoa New Zealand in October. Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit a Press Release Cathedral Dean Boise, ID The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Featured Events Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ center_img Rector Knoxville, TN Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Hopkinsville, KY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Anglican Communion, Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Belleville, IL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Smithfield, NC Press Release Service Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Tampa, FL An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Washington, DC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Director of Music Morristown, NJ The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Albany, NY Ecumenical & Interreligious Youth Minister Lorton, VAlast_img read more

Salto House / AMZ Arquitetos

first_img Salto House / AMZ Arquitetos Projects ArchDaily Save this picture!© Maíra Acayaba+ 16 Share ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/537593/salto-house-amz-arquitetos Clipboard ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/537593/salto-house-amz-arquitetos Clipboard 2013 Year:  Houses photographs:  Maíra AcayabaPhotographs:  Maíra AcayabaInterior Design:AMZ arquitetosStructure Engineer:Ney CostantiniContractor:José Augusto Dip, Geová FrancoSite Area:2.500 sqmArchitect In Charge:Pablo Alvarenga, Manoel Maia, Adriana ZampieriCity:SaltoCountry:BrazilMore SpecsLess SpecsSave this picture!© Maíra AcayabaRecommended ProductsDoorspanoramah!®ah! PivotEnclosures / Double Skin FacadesFranken-SchotterFacade System –  LINEADoorsLibartVertical Retracting Doors – Panora ViewEnclosures / Double Skin FacadesRodecaRound Facade at Omnisport Arena ApeldoornText description provided by the architects. Located in Salto, countryside of Sao Paulo, this is a vacation dwelling for a large family; with a total area of 650m² built on a 2500m² plot.Save this picture!© Maíra AcayabaThe program was spread horizontally on the plot, according to suitable views and sun orientation for the rooms, which sizes and position generated the irregular shape of the building.Save this picture!© Maíra AcayabaThe interior common spaces (garage, laundry and guest bedrooms excluded), are continuous. The kitchen wall is a large sliding panel that allows the integration to the dining room whenever desirable (as shown in the schematic plan).Save this picture!IsometricSocial areas that overlook the valley are all glazed. On the west facade, a wooden vertical brise-soleil was applied in order to protect the living room from the afternoon sun. The bedrooms are protected by sliding louvered doors. In the edges of the house, near the neighbor’s setback limit, blank walls frame the interior views and maintain privacy inside the glazed areas.Save this picture!© Maíra AcayabaProject gallerySee allShow lessCurucura House / Unoencinco ArquitectosSelected ProjectsA Future Without Slums: Too Good to be True?Articles Share Area:  640 m² Area:  640 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project Architects: AMZ Arquitetos Area Area of this architecture project “COPY” Photographs Year:  2013 Brazil Salto House / AMZ ArquitetosSave this projectSaveSalto House / AMZ Arquitetos CopyHouses•Salto, Brazil “COPY” CopyAbout this officeAMZ ArquitetosOfficeFollowProductsWoodConcrete#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesSaltoHousesBrazilPublished on August 18, 2014Cite: “Salto House / AMZ Arquitetos” 18 Aug 2014. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Browse the CatalogPanels / Prefabricated AssembliesTechnowoodSiding Façade SystemPlasticsMitrexSolar SidingMetal PanelsAurubisCopper Alloy: Nordic BronzeArmchairsAndreu WorldGrand Raglan – Lounge ChairSinksBradley Corporation USASinks – Frequency® FL-SeriesPlantingSikaGreen RoofsStonesCosentinoSilestone Surfaces – Ethereal CollectionMetal PanelsLongboard®Aluminum Battens – Link & Lock – 8″Panels / Prefabricated AssembliesFranken-SchotterFacade Panels – Dietfurt LimestoneWindowsRabel Aluminium SystemsMinimal Casement Windows – Rabel 8400 Slim Super Thermal PlusWoodGustafsWood Cladding in St. Erik Eye HospitalLightsKKDCLighting – Groove FLEXMore products »Save世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my streamlast_img read more